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T O P I C
Your E-Mail Is Safe
December 28th 2002, 22:14 CET by zimbardo_ugly

CNN Reports: "The White House is proposing an Internet-wide monitoring center to detect and defend against major cyber-attacks, but the Bush administration sought to ease worries it might scrutinize individual users' e-mails along with other data traffic."

So, the e-mail is safe. It's just "other data traffic".

But wait, there's more. Here is a carefully constructed puzzle: he, who untangles it, gets to know whether the government is, in fact, planning to read his e-mail, or not.

"Clarke wrote there was "nothing ... which in any way suggests or proposes a government system that could extend to monitoring individuals' e-mails.""


http://www.cnn.com/2002/TECH/internet/12/23/cyber.security.ap/index.html
CNN news story
C O M M E N T S
Home » Topic: Your E-Mail Is Safe

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#1 by Russ
2002-12-28 22:28:32
So this is the civil liberties thread?

Morality is the theory that every human act must be either right or wrong, and that 99% of them are wrong.
#2 by Russ
2002-12-28 22:29:44
Can we get the government to open up my regular mail too? Just to check for anthrax spores and whatnot ya know. Also, they can throw out my junk mail at the same time.

Morality is the theory that every human act must be either right or wrong, and that 99% of them are wrong.
#3 by Dethstryk
2002-12-28 22:34:50
jemartin@tcainternet.com
I don't want the government to know how many people offer to clean my septic tank.

#4 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-28 22:35:10
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
My apartment complex has implemented one of the greatest ideas ever.  In the mailbox room, they have a large garbage can there so you can easily throw away your junk mail on the spot without having to take it back to your apartment.  Very convenient.

Put on your two step shoes, lose the blues and dance like it's year zero.
#5 by Matt Davis
2002-12-28 22:49:33
http://looroll.com
The police have recommended to me to shred any bill or official document before putting it in the rubbish as my details including gas, cable and debit card details have been exposed and noted on computers seized from a bunch of less than honourable type men (most likely eastern euro mafia).

I've had to get all my cards changed and my bills re-assigned with security checks before I can change addresses again as these guys were planning on changing my address on all my bills to where they want to stay, run up huge bills over 3 months and then forward them back to my current address. I've also had to sign up to a credit agency that monitors new CC's and other things with my name and previous addresses on them and they contact me to make sure its me or not.

Here's the scariest part, why did they target me? because someone is working from the inside at my bank and handing them details of people with good solid incomes and good credit.

Now, the police tell me they have a large number of email addresses that they are currently monitoring for additional information, naturally I'm probably not going to hear anything more from it, but I'm glad the police do have powers here to monitor email when they have a valid reason to hopefully stop other people going through this small nightmare I've gone through.

Freedom has a price.

#6 by LoneStar
2002-12-28 23:17:36
cwcraig64@hotmail.com
PGP

Opinions are like assholes, everybody has one
#7 by Marsh Davies
2002-12-28 23:22:27
www.verbalchilli.com
Fucking hell! What bank are you with?

- Marsh -
#8 by jafd
2002-12-28 23:31:43
I assume they are scanning every piece of email already. NUCLEAR BOMB!

#9 by Matt Davis
2002-12-28 23:33:21
http://looroll.com
I'm with Natwest, but the police told me that all of the banks have exactly the same problem, changing banks won't make a single bit of difference.

Natwest wrote me a letter themselves a couple of days later and it will be followed by a call round to discuss the problems and how they intend to make sure it doesn't happen again.

I don't see how any bank can stop all employees from seeing your details, its kind of essential, and all the checks in the world aren't going to eliminate the problem, short of never letting those people never leave the bank or talk to anyone.

I'm not the only person I know to have had this problem happen, there are at 2 good friends and a few friends of friends who have had the same problem, one of them actually had $10,000 spent on credit cards they never recieved, and they didn't know until thier phone didn't work so they contacted the telco and were told that the account address was wrong, a nice $400 bill had been run up.

#10 by zimbardo_ugly
2002-12-29 00:33:28
zimbardo_ugly@hotmail.com
I voted NO and this shit popped up.

.i lu doi ringos.star. xu do puku'aroroi dunli dopecaku leni virnu li'u
.i lu go'i co'i le pamoi se morji be mi li'u
#11 by Dethstryk
2002-12-29 00:59:57
jemartin@tcainternet.com
And you're still ugly.

#12 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-29 01:04:41
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
If that sig is written in Klingon, I'm going to kick you in the nuts.

Put on your two step shoes, lose the blues and dance like it's year zero.
#13 by ...an ethereal being...
2002-12-29 01:20:47
Here's the scariest part, why did they target me? because someone is working from the inside at my bank and handing them details of people with good solid incomes and good credit.


I've done consulting work for the Fraud Department of a large private label credit card processor.  A good amount of credit card fraud is internal fraud from Customer Service or Collection Representatives pulling account information and/or selling accounts.  The company recently busted someone for selling credit card info for $100 an account.  They eventually get caught because the customer service system tracks which associates access the accounts.

Another good one is gasoline fraud.  The scammers make valid credit cards, real enough that an automated scanner will read them.  They then go to gas stations in panel vans modified with 55-gallon drums inside connected to an outside fill nozzle.  They use the card at automated pumps, pumping a full tank of gas into the drums (not enough to trigger an immediate alert).  They keep visiting gas stations until the drums are full.  They then sell the gas to turn it back into cash.  The fraud watch systems eventually catch the repeat activity and the cards get shutdown, but the scammers just switch to another card and keep going.

Read, Understand, Post: Choose any two.
#14 by LPMiller
2002-12-29 01:21:33
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
it's greek. Duh.

I believe I can fly......urk.
#15 by bago
2002-12-29 03:43:57
manga_Rando@hotmail.com
to YOU!

There are only 10 types of people in the world - those that understand binary and those that don't.
#16 by yotsuya
2002-12-29 05:58:21
It would appear that Ng Yo has been smoking those Japanese peanuts again...

Lust can never be satisfied with a pink highlighter
#17 by Ryslin
2002-12-29 09:47:45
(waves piece of paper)
Very scary. Course it could be anyone whom you have to give your credit info to. In my business unless you have the permissions you cannot see anything more than the last 4 digits of ye ole credit card.
If you purchase internet with check or bank draft we can't see anything at all.

This makes password recovery difficult as we have to verify the account in some way first.

There was a big tado about the fact my company even lets us view passwords a wile back.

NO!
#18 by Ryslin
2002-12-29 09:47:46
(waves piece of paper)
Very scary. Course it could be anyone whom you have to give your credit info to. In my business unless you have the permissions you cannot see anything more than the last 4 digits of ye ole credit card.
If you purchase internet with check or bank draft we can't see anything at all.

This makes password recovery difficult as we have to verify the account in some way first.

There was a big tado about the fact my company even lets us view passwords a wile back.

NO!
#19 by Ryslin
2002-12-29 09:48:16
(waves piece of paper)
Great a double post. Lovely, I am just so joyous.

NO!
#20 by zimbardo_ugly
2002-12-29 11:11:24
zimbardo_ugly@hotmail.com
Warren: sig is in Lojban, actually. Never been used in Star Trek and if anyone has any evidence to the contrary, I'll remove it with a blowtorch together with my monitor.

.i lu doi ringos.star. xu do puku'aroroi dunli dopecaku leni virnu li'u
.i lu go'i co'i le pamoi se morji be mi li'u
#21 by bishop
2002-12-29 12:29:24
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
Your coloring jaded there.
#22 by bishop
2002-12-29 12:30:19
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
I shouldn't have tried writing it two ways at the same time.

You're
#23 by Marsh Davies
2002-12-29 13:17:51
www.verbalchilli.com
From Sub-bin:
It made me swear at Christ


Hahah haaaaaah haha hah aha haha.

I could only get to the end of paragraph two before my What? levels threatened to fry my capillaries.

- Marsh -
#24 by Marsh Davies
2002-12-29 18:32:58
www.verbalchilli.com
You know what's silly? The fact that all the American mirrors for the Splinter Cell demo are faster by a factor of 4 than any of the European ones. At some of the rates I was getting from the English mirrors, it would be quicker for me to catch a train to their offices, break in and write the fucking thing to a CD.

Okay, well maybe not a train.

- Marsh -
#25 by Fallon
2002-12-29 18:45:52
http://www.fagnews.com
Okay, well maybe not a train.


Walking in the opposite direction is usually faster than trains.

"Will Wright, creator of The Sims, is 98% carbon and 2% plaster."
#26 by Matt Davis
2002-12-29 19:05:05
http://looroll.com
Marsh,

If you were on blueyonder (Telewest) they have a huge FTP for their users with all the latest game demos and patches on, I'd petition your ISP to do the same for you.

#27 by Neale
2002-12-29 20:40:07
neale@pimurho.co.uk www.pimurho.co.uk
Marsh: and they're pretty good at getting new stuff on there too (they had the Splinter Cell demo mirrored instantly, with permission too), and requests for map packs etc tend to get results.

You can't derail this train of idiocy, Shadarr. Not even with a big fat cow of logic on the tracks. - Bailey
#28 by Marsh Davies
2002-12-29 20:46:26
www.verbalchilli.com
Neato. I may go with blueyonder next year when I move out. Since I'm in uni accommodation, however, I have to use their connection, and I doubt the uni would host any such things given that they ban multiplayer of any kind across their network. Bah!

How does Blueyonder compare with BT after the price cuts?

- Marsh -
#29 by Matt Davis
2002-12-29 21:10:37
http://looroll.com
I have 1mbit internet only, thats no phone line and no Cable TV in my package and its 40 a month, 512k is 25 a month, That compares with BT's 512k package at 30 a month, but you have to pay the phone line rental on top of that (10+pm), so it depends whether you ever use a landline for anything (my last landline bill was about 5p worth of calls).

I picked up a cheap linksys router so all my machines can be connected without the need to use one as a gateway. But if you have just the one machine you can plug in the cable into your network port and away you go.

#30 by chris
2002-12-29 21:13:37
cwb@shaithis.com http://www.cerebraldebris.com
Sort of on topic -

I'm most of the way through Orwell's "1984" right now and holy fuck, is it ever good. I mean really good. I mean "all of the stupid anime and dystopian sci-fi I have ever seen can not even touch this" kind of good. I would be amazed if Terry Gilliam has not read 1984, because Brazil is essentially the same story, just on a lot of hallucinogens (and without a lot of the political explanations).

Highly recommended, though I somehow suspect that plenty of the folks here have already read it.

-chris
#31 by Marsh Davies
2002-12-29 21:32:34
www.verbalchilli.com
Have a go at Brave New World once you've finished that, Chris. The two are often compared, and are, probably rightly, considered the ancestors of all sci-fi, along with 2001 and a few notable others.

- Marsh -
#32 by Russ
2002-12-29 21:39:33
ditto on Brave New World. Excellent book.

Morality is the theory that every human act must be either right or wrong, and that 99% of them are wrong.
#33 by MCorleone
2002-12-29 21:49:38
I'm amazed some people haven't read it.  That along with Orwell's Animal Farm, Huxley's Brave New World, and some others whose names escape me at the moment were core curriculum in my High School English classes.

Imagine the world in a bottle.  We take that bottle, smash it, and open your throat with it.  I warn you, we are murderous - COIL
#34 by Matt Davis
2002-12-29 21:56:34
http://looroll.com
Brave new world was required reading when I was at school.

#35 by chris
2002-12-29 23:07:00
cwb@shaithis.com http://www.cerebraldebris.com
Hmm... I was mainly required to read more of the "great american authors of the 19th century" sort of stuff. Melville, Hawthorne, Faulkner, etc. Oh, and Shakespeare. Lots of Shakespeare. Which would be great if Shakespeare was meant to be read, but it's not. It's meant to be seen on stage (and not in a pretentious, everyone dressed in black, art-school production either).

I had to read Faulkner's "Barn Burning" four separate times. 10th grade, 12th grade, first semester english at art school, and third-semester english at the other college I went to. By the latter two, I was getting REALLY good grades on the essays I invariably had to write about it. :P

Unfortunately, I don't particularly enjoy the authors of that era (don't even get me started on Hawthorne). Only interesting things I ever got to read in school were a couple of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller books... both 20th century authors.

Brave New World is added to my wish list. Right now I'm cruising through the books I got for Xmas. Just finished 1984, and am now moving on to Catcher in the Rye. Then Animal Farm, then The Alchemist.

-chris
#36 by Ashiran
2002-12-29 23:29:41
If you are catching up on english literature I would recommend Being There.This book makes a great display of how empty modern social behavoir really is.

Also you can finish reading it in one afternoon.

#37 by MCorleone
2002-12-29 23:42:30
Camus' The Stranger

Imagine the world in a bottle.  We take that bottle, smash it, and open your throat with it.  I warn you, we are murderous - COIL
#38 by chris
2002-12-29 23:57:42
cwb@shaithis.com http://www.cerebraldebris.com
Keep the recommendations coming! =)

I'm definitely interested in any good english literature from the 20th century, particularly stuff like Arthur Miller's work, or Orwell's... allegorical or direct socio-political commentary. 1984 is about as Sci-Fi as I like, tho.

-chris
#39 by Darkseid-D
2002-12-30 01:17:18
rogerboal@hotmail.com
Lovecrafts work is also worth a read.

Trust me, Im a professional.
#40 by jafd
2002-12-30 01:21:16
Holy cow. You've lived this long without reading 1984 -or- Catcher in the Rye? I envy the enjoyment you are experiencing.

I'll add Liege-Killer, Ash Ock, and The Paratwa, all by Christopher Hinz, to the recommendation list. Not really in the same league, but still great stuff.

#41 by Terata
2002-12-30 01:26:17
I passed this link to a friend of mine just a few days back as an example of Lovecraft's best stuff:

http://www.deliverance.mcmail.com/lovecraft/ward/cdward.htm

Fantastic read, and becomes even more interesting the second time.  Be warned it starts off a bit slow.
#42 by Terata
2002-12-30 01:27:27
Cursed lack of auto-parsing.  Here's the non-lazy version:

The Case of Charles Dexter Ward
#43 by Foodbunny
2002-12-30 01:28:39
foodbunny@attbi.com http://www.foodbunny.com
Pretty much everything Lovecraft ever wrote.  Well, except his letters.

It won't have any impact on DNF.  Nothing really does.
#44 by Squeaky
2002-12-30 01:29:33
The H.P. Lovecraft Library

Almost everything Lovecraft wrote in PDF format.

#45 by Squeaky
2002-12-30 01:30:01
Damn, foody beat me to it.

#46 by BabiG
2002-12-30 01:32:22
Try We also, by Zamyatin (forgot the first name). Read it for one of my classes, and is very similar to 1984. Most think it was definitely an influence on 1984, seeing that many of the plot points are similar and it was written 20-30 years before. Got the author exiled from his mother country Russia, despite not being formally published there till the 1980's. It is a translation, so it's not as smooth a read as 1984, but it's worth reading all the same.
#47 by mgns
2002-12-30 01:41:53
Chris,

I noticed you'd read Lullaby. Palahniuk has written more novels, I enjoyed Survivor alot, so unless you've already checked his prior stuff out you should go ahead. Don't be afraid to pick up Fight Club - it's a bit different from the movie, not better, not worse - just different.
But Survivor is his best work to date.

'd offer up a brick to the back of your head boy, if I were Cain.
#48 by Gabe
2002-12-30 01:50:08
http://www.dartpublishing.com
Survivor is his best work to date.

That's unfortunate.
#49 by mgns
2002-12-30 01:53:29
I'm sorry, what?

'd offer up a brick to the back of your head boy, if I were Cain.
#50 by General Disarray
2002-12-30 02:17:46
newsflash@yourmomisacunt.com
CHRISTMAS
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