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T O P I C
With a smile on the lips and a hole in the head.
December 3rd 2002, 04:26 CET by Ashiran

Philips has released a kind of digital paper that is infinitely reusable. It displays text and pictures just like wood-based paper, yet you can erase and rewrite on it over and over again.
Great you say, no more need to cut trees down for more paper. It might even cause people to start writing again.
 
However, there is something that bothers me greatly about this development.

In this Information Age we live in, we have access to more information then ever before. Countless different types of media are available for us to use. The sheer magnitude of it is mind-boggling, but current data stores will look like nearly nothing compared to what we will produce ten years from now.
 
You see, even with all the information currently available to us, the part of it that gets stored on
long-lasting mediums is very small. If you ever tried to locate an old digital file on the Internet (more
obscure than subst or smartdrv) you will have a hard time finding a link that works. The same goes for
patches for old games.
Trying to find information about an old TV show? You might be lucky if you find a forgotten fan site
somewhere. Old games don't work any more on your new system. In a couple of years, they won't even remember how to make the computers of a few years ago.
 
The point is that information/knowledge is developed, presented, processed and lost faster then ever. For things that normally get published on paper it
isn't so bad. But for items that are strictly digital? Your CDs aren't going to last forever you know. And
when the CD with your favourite game breaks down after 20 years, you will never be able to play it again. Not that would matter much cause there wouldn't be a computer around able to run it.
 
What do you care? Tell me.
C O M M E N T S
Home » Topic: With a smile on the lips and a hole in the head.

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#1 by chris
2002-12-03 04:33:33
cwb@shaithis.com http://www.cerebraldebris.com
I've actually run into the frustration of the digital information half-life (not the game) recently, trying to get some old DOS games to run. It's a pain in the ass.

But I think that as more and more people use computers, the demand for backwards compatibility continues to increase. Hopefully hardware/software manufacturers will pay attention to this.

In other news: I want a tablet PC. =)

-chris
#2 by Squeaky
2002-12-03 04:59:10
I've had problems trying to get Space Quest 5 to work. I've managed to play through most of the game. But in the scene where you have to rescue Cliffy in The HEV (or whatever it was), the game runs so fast that just tapping foreward shoots you off into deep space.

A few months ago I was trying to play the original System Shock, and I kept on getting some stupid error (something about salting the fries).

I've been looking around town for any place that is selling 386 or 486 computers, just so I can play a bunch of old games.

morn is our weekly special at an incredibly low price of $7
Pitiful DVD Collection
#3 by bago
2002-12-03 05:19:40
manga_Rando@hotmail.com
And people wonder if there's going to be a market for emulators...

There are only 10 types of people in the world - those that understand binary and those that don't.
#4 by jjohnsen
2002-12-03 05:40:56
http://www.johnsenclan.com
486 computers for less than $10.

I am trying to catch up to Ergo's Dvd collection.
#5 by Squeaky
2002-12-03 05:44:19
#4: sweet!

morn is our weekly special at an incredibly low price of $7
Pitiful DVD Collection
#6 by chris
2002-12-03 06:05:00
cwb@shaithis.com http://www.cerebraldebris.com
Yeh, see, it's great to have an old system... but now find all of the old DOS programs you needed to get those games running. And spend all that time tweaking the config.sys and autoexec.bat to make them work. =)

I would SO MUCH rather just click "winDOS" in my start menu, and tell it that I have 640kb of base memory free, and 16mb of high memory, and that I'm running a 486 DX2-66, and that I want mouse and sound support... and let it do its thang.

Yes, Bago - I would pay money for a flawless, real virtual-machine DOS emulator from MS.

We're getting close... Charles pointed me toward some nifty software. But it still doesn't work with Dark Sun, which is the only DOS game I'm really worried about at present.

-chris
#7 by jjohnsen
2002-12-03 06:24:11
http://www.johnsenclan.com
What is the fastest computer you can play games like Shattered Lands and the gold box games on?  OR is it windows 95 and above that cause the real problems?

I am trying to catch up to Ergo's Dvd collection.
#8 by VeeSPIKE
2002-12-03 06:25:56
The Ultima Collector's Edition that Origin released a year or so ago had a program called MoSlo that would emulate slower processors. It was required to run the oldest of the games on a pentium or faster cpu. I have no idea how well it would work on a P4 running XP though.

Vintage Packard Bells??!? ick.

I have a lot of old files stored on 5.25 floppys that I cannot recover at the moment - I do not have a working drive. And I refuse to put things on 3.5 floppies anymore - seems like every one I use develops bad sectors after being written on. But I spent a day or two burning every file I could recover on to CD's. And at some point I would assume that I will be burning those CD's to whichever format in the future that replaces them (I am slacking - I am not up to burning DVD'd yet.) And that is what will solve the problem presented - individual efforts to preserve and update whatever information they have so that it is available to others.

Of course, the other question that needs to be asked is - does a lot of this information being lost actually need to be saved? I mean, a lot of what is out there now is not worth preserving on anything other than a strictly personal level. Who needs (or wants) 5 year old blog records?

The media doesn't educate, it sensationalizes. That's why there's no learning curve, just repeated bouts of gross stupidity. Bailey
#9 by HiredGoons
2002-12-03 06:32:46
Topic

The point is that information/knowledge is developed, presented, processed and lost faster then ever. For things that normally get published on paper it
isn't so bad.


This hasn't been my experience.

I can do research in 10 minutes that took me a day 15 years ago, thanks to digital storage and services like Lexis and Medline.  Before these services I had to use huge bound indices.  Let me tell you, it sucked.

Storing information digitally (as opposed to paper) isn't the perfect solution, but it is much cheaper.  All those paper books, journals etc take up quite a bit of space.  Plus, if you think the shelf-life of a CD is bad -- paper is worse.
#10 by VeeSPIKE
2002-12-03 06:46:38
Storing information digitally (as opposed to paper) isn't the perfect solution, but it is much cheaper.  All those paper books, journals etc take up quite a bit of space.  Plus, if you think the shelf-life of a CD is bad -- paper is worse.

 
Paper, with proper care and construction, will last hundreds or thousands of years. But that isn't even the point. In a thousand years, the only thing that will stop people from being able to read a paper record of something is if the language it is written in is no longer in use and lost. Will there still be CD readers in a hundred years?

The media doesn't educate, it sensationalizes. That's why there's no learning curve, just repeated bouts of gross stupidity. Bailey
#11 by m0nty
2002-12-03 07:04:01
http://tinfinger.blogspot.com
I write about this stuff for a living.

And thus I don't feel like talking about it here.
#12 by HiredGoons
2002-12-03 07:09:34
Paper, with proper care and construction, will last hundreds or thousands of years.


If you want to spend a fortune on an individual piece of paper.  Almost every university has a rare books room that has climate control and a dozen other things to make paper degradation less likely.  These rooms are expensive.  Such precautions also severely limit access to the items placed there.

On the other hand, when those same contents are converted to a digital format -- they become available to everyone.

Will there still be CD readers in a hundred years?


Maybe, maybe not.  If CDs don't exist, then it will be because some other digital format is superior.

The research time that is saved with digital information storage/searching methods is enormous.  I don't know how I survived without it.
#13 by Caryn
2002-12-03 07:14:03
carynlaw@pacbell.net http://www.hellchick.net
VeeSPIKE:

Of course, the other question that needs to be asked is - does a lot of this information being lost actually need to be saved? I mean, a lot of what is out there now is not worth preserving on anything other than a strictly personal level. Who needs (or wants) 5 year old blog records?


The personal blogs and ICQ histories of the average person might not need storing, but I think Ashiran was referring to something that HiredGoons referenced: journals, research materials, etc. all being put on electronic media, and the potential that that electronic media has down the line of being unusable. When I first started doing science research, I had to find old Astrophysical Journal and PASP papers by going down into the library and pulling down the heavy bound indices off the shelves. Then NASA started a cross-referenced, searchable index on the web where I could even print out the paper there or read it online.

I think that the important stuff will always be ported over to whatever new storage media exists, just like science research papers make the transition from paper media to electronic, while the blogs of the world get left behind because they're not important enough to keep, so I don't think there's really a danger of losing it. It's just a matter of what you deem important. I do all of my fiction writing electronically these days. I used to keep paper backups, but I've gotten lazy and now just keep a current CD as a backup. My stuff might be one of those things that gets left behind.

"Went to eat my breakfast the next morning, the blues started to walkin' all over my bread..." -- Sonny Boy Williamson, 23 Hours Too Long
#14 by Christoph
2002-12-03 07:32:31
christoph753@hotmail.com
For quite a while now, I have been desperately wanting to go through Crusaders of the Dark Savant again AKA Wizardry 7.  Unfortunately I have 2 game boxes with no discs in them.  So I found a Cd on Ebay and ordered it and it wouldnt run on my P2 300.  It wont run on my new Athlon 2000+ either.  My old 386SX 25 is sitting in the corner of my basement here with broken pins from the monitor to the video card, and I'm not sure how good of shape the hard drive is either, it just up and deleted windows 3.1 one day before the monitor died.  I miss the simplicity of my old MS DOS based machine, I could do minor qbasic programming, configure my autoexec.bat and config.sys myself and troubleshoot most of my own problems.  Now with the 2 Windows based machines I've had, it seems I have to ask 3 or 4 techie friends to try and troubleshoot anything more than a minor glitch.

Programs like MOSLO can only do so much on the faster systems.  In researching about this problem online, i have found that there is a x86 emulator out there but it doesnt always work for all games and, at first glance, did not look easy to use either.  I'll try and find a link to the emulator for anyone who wants it.

By the way, Crusaders of the Dark Savant may be one of the best RPG's I've ever played, possibly even one of the best games I have ever played.

If I were a younger man, I would write a history of human stupidity; and i would climb to the top of Mount McCabe and lie down on my back with my history for a pillow; and I would take from the ground some of the blue-white poison that makes statues of men; and I would make a statue of myself, lying on my back, grinning horribly and thumbing my nose at You Know Who. - Bokonon
#15 by None-1a
2002-12-03 07:33:59
The Ultima Collector's Edition that Origin released a year or so ago had a program called MoSlo that would emulate slower processors. It was required to run the oldest of the games on a pentium or faster cpu. I have no idea how well it would work on a P4 running XP though.


I have no idea how well MoSlo works on modern cpus, but I have used something similar called turbo. Unfortunately they take a lot of trail and error to zero in on the exact percentage to use. Even then if the games you're trying to play use clock cycles over frame rate for timing you're SOL. Over all it's just not worth the hassle.


Anyone thinking about setting up a vintage gaming box I'd really recommend giving yourself a lot more flexibility by going with a Pentium class cpu, a sound blaster compatible sound card and a voodoo1/2 on a properly setup windows 95 install. MoSlo/Turbo work great on this setup, and when setup right 95 will run just about every dos based program will out the hassle of editing config files. Plus you can run later dos games that require the faster cpu and 3d card (as well as the few older w95 games that refuse to run under compatibility modes).
#16 by chris
2002-12-03 08:30:40
cwb@shaithis.com http://www.cerebraldebris.com
jj -

The issue isn't the speed, it's that darksun wants 4kb more base memory than I can free up...  more than I can get WinXP (or any other windows) to give it. I used to be able to start in DOS mode with 95/98 and futz around and get it working, but there's not way to do it with XP, that I've found.

-chris
#17 by Ashiran
2002-12-03 11:42:20
Who needs (or wants) 5 year old blog records?

While by themselves these blogs are indeed unimportant as a whole collection they are not. Blogs and all that other "trivial" information is what sketches the picture of the current society.

You people remember the late 80's early 90's? It wasn't the same as it was now was it? No cellphones, infant internet, switching from the distinct 80's look, different music. All these things and many more shape an image of what society was like at that time. Do you think you can find anything about the normal way off life during those years on the net? My guess is yes, but compared to the ammount of information that was available during that timeperiod, the available info now will be only but a fraction.

It is debatable of barely having knowlegde of the way of life a couple of decades ago is really that bad but still. Things like that Dirk Benedict had a big fanclub for instance! And he still does!

The little hand that could! *note: that is not a DVD case*
#18 by Dethstryk
2002-12-03 13:44:58
jemartin@tcainternet.com
I just want someone to release a version of Sam and Max that is compatible with, I don't know.. computers. Jumping through hoops to play the damn game is annoying.

Any faith I had in humanity has taken a train to Monte Carlo and spent the last of my savings on roulette.
#19 by Duality
2002-12-03 13:54:10
Dualipuff@yahoo.com http://stratoscape.ath.cx/
For the average person, what gets better care -- a CD or a piece of paper with some notes jotted down?

Speaking of my experience, alone, I can't find notes from classes even a year ago (damn shame, I used to have some awesome JFK conspiracy notes from a class I took in HS).  But I still have the first CD I ever owned (heh Another Bad Creation ;).

But I think that as more and more people use computers, the demand for backwards compatibility continues to increase.


Do you really think so?  I don't see all that many new computer users even understanding the concept of backward compatibility.
#20 by Marsh Davies
2002-12-03 14:13:11
www.verbalchilli.com
Oooh.

I've not heard anything about this movie. Looks to be reasonably bloody amazing, though.

- Marsh -
#21 by Ashiran
2002-12-03 14:16:48
I don't see all that many new computer users even understanding the concept of backward compatibility.

Which is also part of the problem. It's not just information getting lost on fysical media it's also the loss of knowlegde with people who die. For those who read The Foundation series, you know what I mean.

The little hand that could! *note: that is not a DVD case*
#22 by Huge Wood Farmer
2002-12-03 15:36:04
Marsh,

I'm going to have to go ahead and concur, that looks quite cool.

Computers are useless. They can only give you answers
- Pablo Picasso
#23 by Funkdrunk
2002-12-03 15:44:09
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
I don't understand something.

Bid for Power started as a dragonball mod, and was foxed.  And so, as if people don't learn from history we now have Dragonball Unlimited.

I just don't get it.

Funk.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that roses smell better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.  ~Henry L. Mencken
#24 by Huge Wood Farmer
2002-12-03 16:01:36
Well, people are dumb, EOD.

Computers are useless. They can only give you answers
- Pablo Picasso
#25 by Funkdrunk
2002-12-03 16:02:17
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
Oh, and by the way, here's a pretty positive write-up about Equilibrium.

Funk.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that roses smell better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.  ~Henry L. Mencken
#26 by Caryn
2002-12-03 17:11:09
carynlaw@pacbell.net http://www.hellchick.net
Funkdrunk:

Bid for Power started as a dragonball mod, and was foxed.  And so, as if people don't learn from history we now have Dragonball Unlimited.


It's because they're sticking it to The Man. I've seen more than one mod team know that what they're doing will get them foxed, but they get defiant about it because they see it as their right to make a mod based on anything they want, and they do it anyway. I can't say that's what this team is doing specifically, but given how high-profile Bid for Power's initial struggle was in the mod community, I can't imagine that they don't know about it.

Duality:

Speaking of my experience, alone, I can't find notes from classes even a year ago (damn shame, I used to have some awesome JFK conspiracy notes from a class I took in HS).  But I still have the first CD I ever owned (heh Another Bad Creation ;).


I'm the opposite -- I tend to save things on paper but will toss a CD if it looks like I might never want/need it again. It was only in the last few months that I finally got rid of a bunch of college binders with class notes in them that I'd kept for several years. I think it's the impermanence of digital media that makes me feel that way -- it's a RW CD, I can probably just find another copy. Whereas a binder full of handwritten class notes is not easily reproduceable.

"It's not stupid! It's advanced!"
#27 by MCorleone
2002-12-03 17:23:29
From the Equilibrium review:

Well, what if something happened and he didn't get his dosage? What if some of the feelings that had been kept at bay so long started to creep back? What if the most dangerous man with a firearm started to realize just how wrong this way of life is and wanted to do something about it?

Well, that's the makings of a crackling good story.


It's original stories like this, and maybe a cop, on the EDGE!!1 stories that are going to re-define the art of movie-making!  Oh the imagination!  Gentlemen, welcome to 1948.

Imagine the world in a bottle.  We take that bottle, smash it, and open your throat with it.  I warn you, we are murderous - COIL
#28 by Funkdrunk
2002-12-03 17:25:09
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
Caryn

It's because they're sticking it to The Man. I've seen more than one mod team know that what they're doing will get them foxed, but they get defiant about it because they see it as their right to make a mod based on anything they want, and they do it anyway.


This reminds me of the great article you wrote about trying using other peoples properties.  I lost the link to it.  And the forum on the article contained very amazing ignorance at levels heretofore unseen.

Funk.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that roses smell better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.  ~Henry L. Mencken
#29 by Funkdrunk
2002-12-03 17:33:50
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
Duality

I still have the first CD I ever owned (heh Another Bad Creation ;)


And you admit to this.  You are a brave man.

Funk.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that roses smell better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.  ~Henry L. Mencken
#30 by Caryn
2002-12-03 17:36:21
carynlaw@pacbell.net http://www.hellchick.net
Funkdrunk:

This reminds me of the great article you wrote about trying using other peoples properties.  I lost the link to it.  And the forum on the article contained very amazing ignorance at levels heretofore unseen.


Here's the article. I really liked writing this article, even though I got a lot of backlash for it (I was called a nazi, woohoo!). The point of the article was just to point out the reasons why IP laws exist, why they protect everyone and not just The Man, and how you can avoid getting your mod foxed because of them. A lot of people took it as a slam on the mod community and a defense of the big, bad developers.

"It's not stupid! It's advanced!"
#31 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-03 17:48:46
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
If mod makers would just ... I mean, we talk about it around the office sometimes.  For example, why make a Star Wars mod?  Why not make something that is BASED on Star Wars.  It can be pretty obviously derived from Star Wars and still be clear of legal hassles.  But no, they have to use the actual IP.  I don't get it ...

"Quit whining you haven't done anything wrong because, frankly, you haven't done much of anything."
#32 by Matt Davis
2002-12-03 17:51:29
http://looroll.com
What?

"...even going as far as to post that obviously stupid rumor of Microsoft buying out Rare." - LPMiller; 20 March 2002 - 20:07:58
#33 by Caryn
2002-12-03 17:53:53
carynlaw@pacbell.net http://www.hellchick.net
Warren:

It can be pretty obviously derived from Star Wars and still be clear of legal hassles.  But no, they have to use the actual IP.  I don't get it ...


I helped run a workshop at QuakeCon two years ago on mods and foxing, and the most common misconception was that it's okay to do it if the mod team isn't making any money on it. Many mod teams genuinely believe that this is okay, and so they just don't understand that it's not. For most mod teams, it's really just ignorance of the rules; a few mod teams deliberately defy the rules, but not many. I think for those in between they figure that they're too small to get the attention of a big company like LucasArts and so they'll work on their mod hoping they just fly under the company's radar.

"It's not stupid! It's advanced!"
#34 by Funkdrunk
2002-12-03 18:01:59
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
Caryn

That's the article.  Thanks.

Funk.

An idealist is one who, on noticing that roses smell better than a cabbage, concludes that it will also make better soup.  ~Henry L. Mencken
#35 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-03 18:11:41
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
I helped run a workshop at QuakeCon two years ago on mods and foxing, and the most common misconception was that it's okay to do it if the mod team isn't making any money on it. Many mod teams genuinely believe that this is okay, and so they just don't understand that it's not. For most mod teams, it's really just ignorance of the rules; a few mod teams deliberately defy the rules, but not many. I think for those in between they figure that they're too small to get the attention of a big company like LucasArts and so they'll work on their mod hoping they just fly under the company's radar.

I think it's a poor reflection on the mod community though ...  Are they really so completely devoid of original thought that they have to copy someone elses IP to the letter?  It seems to me that you could do something influenced by Star Wars or DragonBall, but have it be your own thing at the same time.  Blah ...

"Quit whining you haven't done anything wrong because, frankly, you haven't done much of anything."
#36 by jjohnsen
2002-12-03 18:23:54
http://www.johnsenclan.com
I think that the important stuff will always be ported over to whatever new storage media exists, just like science research papers make the transition from paper media to electronic, while the blogs of the world get left behind because they're not important enough to keep, so I don't think there's really a danger of losing it.


My problem with this is who decides what is important enough to keep?

I am trying to catch up to Ergo's Dvd collection.
#37 by Bailey
2002-12-03 18:30:10
Marsh

re: Equilibrium

Take the plot of Farenheit 451, throw in some Matrix-y fighting and fruity man-dresses, and you've got an intellectual action thriller on your hands that never lets up, and never lets down!

Ow. My brain hurts now.

"Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law." - Aleister Crowley (1875-1947)
#38 by MCorleone
2002-12-03 18:36:18
I predict it will be a mixed bag.

Imagine the world in a bottle.  We take that bottle, smash it, and open your throat with it.  I warn you, we are murderous - COIL
#39 by AnalFissure
2002-12-03 18:37:23
Of dicks.
#40 by Leslie Nassar
2002-12-03 18:49:11
http://departmentofinternets.com
Equilibrium looks to be Farenheit 451 meets Yevgeny Zamyatin's We meets Brave New World meets The Matrix.

I can't wait to see it.

How sad.  You get airtime on one of the largest radio stations in one of the largest cities in America and as a minister you use this rare opportunity to belch about automobile abuse?
#41 by Caryn
2002-12-03 18:58:19
carynlaw@pacbell.net http://www.hellchick.net
Warren:

I think it's a poor reflection on the mod community though ...  Are they really so completely devoid of original thought that they have to copy someone elses IP to the letter?


I think it's due to the difference between professional developers and the kid who just downloaded Radiant to try and make his own level. By the time you got where you are, Warren, you were part of a group of people that had been weeded out through resumes, hiring processes, the success of past games, etc.

But anybody can download mod tools and use them. The majority of people who do use them, I think, really don't have any aspirations to creating something original. They just want to make something COOL. And to a lot of average gamers, making an exact replica of their favorite movie in their favorite game is the pinnacle of cool.

"It's not stupid! It's advanced!"
#42 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-03 19:09:54
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
Caryn

I agree with what you're saying, but I think there's a difference between making a level of your favorite whatever and creating a full blown mod.  It seems to me that if you were doing a mod, and understand the work required, you would want to try something that actually has a chance of getting completed.  People have seen mods getting foxed over the years ... they must understand what they're doing and the risk they're taking ... It's hard to feel bad for them when they cry about how The Man is shutting them down and so on.  Get a clue, fuckos ...

"Quit whining you haven't done anything wrong because, frankly, you haven't done much of anything."
#43 by Matthew Gallant
2002-12-03 19:10:25
http://www.truemeaningoflife.com
Are they really so completely devoid of original thought that they have to copy someone elses IP to the letter? It seems to me that you could do something influenced by Star Wars or DragonBall, but have it be your own thing at the same time.


I think some of the thought behind it is that they'd like to play a Dragon Ball Z game, but there aren't any for the PC. And since nobody has thought to make a Dragon Ball Z game for PC, I'd argue that the thought is not completely devoid of originality. Star Wars, on the other hand...

Also, I'd argue that if you only copy someone else's IP to the degree that you can't get sued or foxed, then that's actually pretty slimy in addition to being unoriginal. See also: Duke Nukem's personality upgrade for DN3D, those knockoff DVDs that get released soon after the latest Disney film hits theaters, etc.

"Is the internet making people less intelligent?"
"You mean like how video cameras cause thrown objects to hit men in the crotch?"
#44 by Caryn
2002-12-03 19:11:28
carynlaw@pacbell.net http://www.hellchick.net
Warren:

Yeah, I agree, and I was actually going to write a third paragraph and say that I can't extend that benefit of the doubt to a big team creating a Dragonball Z mod.

I'll be very interested in seeing what happens to that mod, because I'm certain it's going to be foxed. And I'll be doubly interested in the team's reaction to it.

"It's not stupid! It's advanced!"
#45 by Matt Davis
2002-12-03 19:12:15
http://looroll.com
It seems to me that you could do something influenced by Star Wars or DragonBall, but have it be your own thing at the same time.  Blah ...


You mean like Quake3Arena influenced UT2K3?

"...even going as far as to post that obviously stupid rumor of Microsoft buying out Rare." - LPMiller; 20 March 2002 - 20:07:58
#46 by Shadarr
2002-12-03 19:13:50
shadarr@yahoo.com http://digital-luddite.com
Considering the number of idea men floating around, there's no excuse for a mod team without ideas.
#47 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-03 19:22:39
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
You mean like Quake3Arena influenced UT2K3?

Zing?

"Quit whining you haven't done anything wrong because, frankly, you haven't done much of anything."
#48 by Fugazi(werking)
2002-12-03 19:23:52
On the subject of books and durability:

Midieval books are tough. One of the main ingredients used in the paper is old linen and those pages are thick and very strong. I had some profs who had several of these books and the only special technique they used to store them was black garbage bags, which prevented them from degrading from light and keeping the bookworms away. Also, the oils from your hands are actually good for the pages and the covers because it prevents them from drying out.

I do think we will have optical drives for a long time. I still use vinyl and turntables and that's pretty odl tech. If they (the tech industry) use the same disc form factor I see no reason why they can't have backwards compatibility.

"Good health" is merely the slowest rate at which one can die.
#49 by Warren Marshall
2002-12-03 19:25:21
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
Also, I'd argue that if you only copy someone else's IP to the degree that you can't get sued or foxed, then that's actually pretty slimy in addition to being unoriginal. See also: Duke Nukem's personality upgrade for DN3D, those knockoff DVDs that get released soon after the latest Disney film hits theaters, etc.

My point is more ... well, take Star Wars for example.  It's a war in space.  You have 2 sides, troops, ships, etc.  Why do you HAVE to do Star Wars?  Is it so hard to come up with your own versions of Stormtroopers and so on?  If it is, you're probably persuing the wrong hobby ...

"Quit whining you haven't done anything wrong because, frankly, you haven't done much of anything."
#50 by Matt Davis
2002-12-03 19:25:54
http://looroll.com
Zing?


What?

"...even going as far as to post that obviously stupid rumor of Microsoft buying out Rare." - LPMiller; 20 March 2002 - 20:07:58
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