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T O P I C
Complexity through Simplicity
March 8th 2002, 02:28 CET by Post-It

Super Mario 64 is one of the most enjoyable games I have played. I spent countless hours exploring and interacting with Miyamoto-sama's world. It is due to one overwhelming factor: simplicity.

Unfortunately many people make the mistake of thinking that simplicity and complexity are polar oppisites. However, this is untrue, simplicity and complicatedness are. Simplicity and complexity can co-exist, and do in the the very best games. Before we move on to games, let me clarify myself. First, let's examine a radio. A radio recieves wireless information from multiple broadcast points and converts that data into coherent audio waves. A very complicated device. But not a very complex one. It has generally only one function: to listen to the radio. It's complicatedness defines and sets its uses. On the other hand, take a regular 3 foot long stick. Very simple, yet inherently complex. A stick can be: a walking cane, a fishing pole, a lever, a javelin, firewood, back scratcher, etc...one is only limited by ones imagination. The simplicty of the stick lets it be infinitely complex because its uses are defined by the user not the device.

Which is why Super Mario 64 and other games like it are so inherently playable, they provide areas in which the user is free to use their imagination. Mario has a very simple set of actions: run, jump, & punch. There are various differences in the type of running/jumping/attacking he can do but, they all basiclly fall under these categories. This combined with an expansive, non-linear environment with no predefined paths enables a user a kind of freedom in the virtual world where they are only limited by their imagination. Sure there are specific goals and tasks but for the most part, how to achieve those goals are left to the player's imagination and not pigeonholed into some pre-set path that the designer envivsioned.

A more recent game that attempts to follow this design style is Grand Theft Auto III. The story is good, the voice acting is excellent, it has a mature theme and style, yet none of these things are what make the game so enjoyable. Instead it is its simple interface with and a non-linear free roaming virtual environment. In GTA3 you can run, jump, attack, and drive a car. Again there are variations of each but almst of all of the activity in the game falls under one of these categories. The game is not what is so good, it is the gamer's imaginiation and creativity that makes the game so good. The user gets to decide how to kill the mob boss or in what path to deliver a stolen car.

So my question is: Why are not developers trying to make more games like this?
C O M M E N T S
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#1 by "ProStyle"
2002-03-08 02:44:56
prostyle@phreez.com
Lack of creativity, easier to build on past franchises, easier to build on ideas and create technology spinoffs off others concepts... etc. And when I say easier do keep in mind it's referring to the travesty that really is the judgement of consumers, and the fact that they buy games based on flash bang whiz boxes and market penetration on their life; no matter how spectacularly innovative or inspiring the game at hand is...
#2 by Matt Perkins
2002-03-08 02:52:36
wizardque@yahoo.com http://whatwouldmattdo.com/
I'd say because it's hard to find the right balance...  The right setup of the world vs the skills pc has...  hard to create such huge beautiful place and have everything be explore by a simplistic being...

self-proclaimed arm chair game designer
The language skills will come...I hope.
#3 by Sgt Hulka
2002-03-08 03:08:57
I enjoyed Mario 64 very much.  The Nintendo people kick ass in the creativity department.

.....Another 0l$en Approved +12 Post!
#4 by Bailey
2002-03-08 03:38:00
Sorry, but your topic is in another castle.

Mario 64 was pretty good, but it contained two things I do dearly despise: fire and ice levels. Oh damn, how I loathe them. Why must all platformers fall back on this? "Well, we gotta have a sky level, and a cave level, and a water level, and hey, who could forget everyone's favorite; levels that make you slide off the edge of the map and die, and level that burn you when you touch the ground! Ice and fire, two family favorites, together at last! Again! For the first time!"

Sir, you are seriously hunting my wumpus.
#5 by bishop
2002-03-08 03:45:04
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
I don't know bailey, after you did everything to do in mario 64, I remember spending a lot of time sliding down thoose hills in the ice place attempting to preform tricks.

For that, I can't say anything bad against them, but it IS a bit idiotic that most platformers have the same type of level sets.

If you're about to die, ask yourself the following question:
#6 by "Anonymous"
2002-03-08 04:07:52
Mario 64 is now a story on this website??  


wtf happened to PC?!?
#7 by Warren Marshall
2002-03-08 04:13:06
http://www.wantonhubris.com/
Topic
So my question is: Why are not developers trying to make more games like this?

Because it's hard?  :)  It depends on your game ... as always.  Having an open ended game where the player can choose to do the quests or not kind of makes it hard to maintain suspense or keep the players focus on the job at hand.  You also have to suspend realism quite a bit with a game like GTA3 ... so you decide to hop into a cab to make a little extra money, then hijack an ambulance to drive people to the hospital, do the next quest and kill some mobsters, then maybe steal a cop car for some vigilante justice ... it kind of stretches the limits of believability.  :)

Anon
wtf happened to PC?!?

Got overrun by anons.

I am a magnificent three toed sloth.
#8 by Bailey
2002-03-08 04:30:54
bishop

I don't know bailey, after you did everything to do in mario 64, I remember spending a lot of time sliding down thoose hills in the ice place attempting to preform tricks.

Call my cynical, (flatterer) but I remember being bumped by a bad guy, falling on my ass, and sliding off the edge of the world a lot more. I'm not saying these levels can't be fun, but they can also be incredibly frustrating at times, and... dammit, are we already off-topic? Wasn't this supposed to be about simplicity?

Anyway, challenge is nice, frustration is irritating, and there's no way to prevent because everyone's skill level is different. So my point is really quite moot, I just like pointing out that ever damn game has fire and ice levels, and they piss me off to no extent.

Thank you, and good night.

Sir, you are seriously hunting my wumpus.
#9 by Greg
2002-03-08 04:42:34
Bailey, I agree with you on that fire world. There was one I remember in Mario 64 that was a bitch, with moving tiles and all.

To answer the question of the topic, my feeling is that developing an open ended world takes more time and effort than one that is paced for the player. Adding the ability to freely roam the world, and have it be as interactive as a player would expect, requires a ton of forethought prior to the actual development. Unlike some of the whiz-bang 3D effects nowadays, the developers really can't just add in a exploration mode when they feel like. As it being part of the development, it really can't be subtracted either. It becomes the game essentially, rather than just being a part of it.

Greg

-Swallow it all and be glad, for a shilling I've paid and a shilling's worth I'll be having!
#10 by bishop
2002-03-08 05:09:41
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
but I remember being bumped by a bad guy, falling on my ass, and sliding off the edge of the world a lot more. I'm not saying these levels can't be fun, but they can also be incredibly frustrating at times,


Yeah, that happened a lot to me as well, but I tend to remember (supposedly dynamic interactive) games in two ways;

What I did on my way to completing the majority (in thoose that don't let you do ALL of them) of goals/tasks/missions/worlds etc.

or

What I did afterwards, when there was nothing to "accomplish" other than saying "I wonder if I can hit a little higher on this wall by bouncing off this platform here..."

GTA3 falls into this category for me.

If you're about to die, ask yourself the following question:
#11 by LPMiller
2002-03-08 05:14:56
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
I....didn't like mario 64.








I'll go now.

What's the point of wearing your favorite rocketship underpants if nobody ever asks to see 'em?
#12 by Post-It
2002-03-08 06:14:10
keithlee@speakeasy.net
I would really encourage everyone to read this article that deals with this subject. It's quite long but well worth the read. IMHO, if the simulated environment is of a high enough fidelity then the player doesn't need that wide of a range of actions. THe enivronment itself should be simulated to the extent that through simple interactions, ie walk, run, jump, push, pull, hit, carry, etc they should be able to use their imagination effecively to deal with all of the challenges that the game presents. Think of how few games really let you perform the most basic of actions I described above.

How many times have you been playing an FPS and you would have to take some alternate route that took you ten minutes to get through only to put you on the oppiste side of a stack of boxes that you were near earlier. And the only reason you couldn't get around the boxes is you couldn't jump on them. In real life, you would just pull yourself up over the boxes, or you're packing an MP-5, a sawed off shotgun, and a few handgrenades and could easily just blow the boxes away. Yet, because the environment is modled to such a low fidelity one cannot interact with it at a level that even 10 year olds understand (if a 10 year old can't jump on a counter to get cookies, they don't give up, they pull themselves up or find a chair and push it over and climb up).

Admittidly this is highly complex. Yet, I think it holds the greatest possibility in terms of gameplay. If a player is allowed to interact with a virtual environment, just like they would in real life, then the suspension of disbelief factor is significantly raised. And is doesn't require complex player controls, whiz bang graphics, or any other new tech whiz bang techinical innovation. It requires a high fidelity modeled environment that a player can interact with in simple ways. So while the technology behind the scenes (the ongoing computer process to keep the environment stable) are never noticed by the player because they are free to use their imagination to interact with the environment.

Essentially, Toto got killed on the way to the Emerald City, so Dorothy never had the chance to pull back the curtain.
#13 by BobJustBob
2002-03-08 06:37:18
I remember not too long ago when I said Mario 64 was one of the best games ever and I was insulted for this belief. To be fair, though, I think it was jafd, and she insults everyone for everything.
#14 by UncleJeet
2002-03-08 06:58:31
I think Mario 64 worked well because it had Mario in it.  He's cute and cuddly and can fix your toliet, if needs be, but only right after he saves his bitch again.  He wears neat red shirts and blue overalls, and sometimes turns into a racoon!  I don't see how Dubya got elected....I clearly wrote in "ITZA ME!  MARIO!"  ....damned crooked politics....

I'm fighting terrorism by playing violent video games!
#15 by bishop
2002-03-08 07:44:16
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
Cute and Cuddly?

You never saw the part-live action series based loosely on Mario Bros' 2.

If you're about to die, ask yourself the following question:
#16 by Charles
2002-03-08 07:57:15
www.bluh.org
#12 Post-It is dead on I think.

Face it, everything we do IRL is based on simple actions.  So doing the same in the game only makes it more enjoyable.

If you have a simple interface, there is less shit to get in the way of a player and his suspension of disbelief.

#17 by UncleJeet
2002-03-08 08:05:19
#15 - bishop:

  Let us not speak of the dark Super Mario Brother Super Show days. Old Lou.  *shudder*

  It's funny because I don't really LOVE the Mario games or anything.  I only ever completed SMB 2 and 64.  I just have an unnatural affection for the little guy.  I cannot explain it.  Perhaps I need therapy....or at least heavy sedation.  TWENTY TWENTY TWENTY FOUR HOURS TO GO-OH-OH!

I'm fighting terrorism by playing violent video games!
#18 by crash
2002-03-08 08:14:16
gabba gabba hey.

- if you can laugh at it, you can live with it.
- "Hey, how 'bout this: fuck you." -LPMiller
#19 by Charles
2002-03-08 08:23:11
www.bluh.org
Ugh.

Joey Ramone is dead.  Please don't dig him up.

#20 by Terata
2002-03-08 08:43:58
I'll just mention a fantastic bit of poetry I remember from the Super Mario Bros Super Show.  This was after Mario was gone and it was hosted by those two surfer guys:

I was walking through the forest
Amongst the redwood trees
When I felt something soft
Brush past my knees
It's a fern!  It's a fern!

I have no idea why I remember that.
#21 by Charles
2002-03-08 08:52:53
www.bluh.org
Those zelda cartoons were the bomb, yo.

#22 by bishop
2002-03-08 09:07:08
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
I remember a brief period of time when he had his own show, but then he was reduced to the ocasional appearance on Captain N.

Oh, the agony.

Did they ever have Samus on that show? The only chars that stick out in my mind is Simon being a fruit, Mega Man or/and Icarus having a really annoying high pitched voice.

Best inspiration to come out of that show, wearing a nes controller for a belt on halloween.

If you're about to die, ask yourself the following question:
#23 by sentinel
2002-03-08 09:40:42
Typically though, as most of the really oldschool console gamers I know agree: the older Mario games on the NES and Mario World on the SNES were way cooler than Mario 64. And they involved very straightforward goals (get as far to the right as you can :D)

But maybe that's just nostalgia.
#24 by godZero
2002-03-08 09:41:54
godzero@gmx.de
Just look at the games that came out last year. There are not more than a couple which were really innovative (or even good, for that matter). Why? There are just very few devs which are ready to take the risk of releasing something "new". Sacrifice, for instance, was a great and quite simple game (speaking controls here), but it didn't sell.

Freedom of choice: DeusEx is one of the best games ever. There was a whole bunch of very intelligent and fresh stuff in there. But it had one problem: it didn't have a very simple interface and it took quite long for the story to develop. I didn't really like it in the beginning. I thought the controls were too complicated for a first person game and the beginning was, well, boring.
If I hadn't read so many good reviews, I wouldn't have even bothered to play further. As the story unfolded, I got sucked in and ended up really loving the game.

But most people stopped after the first level. Most people just want to relax, not to think. DX required a little bit different thinking, which is what many, many people are not capable of. That's why DeusEx didn't sell as much as it should have.

-------------------------

The counterpart: just bought Serious Sam 2 yesterday. It's a good example of simple, but fun game. It just blows me away. And guess what: this game will sell much more than DX...
#25 by Bailey
2002-03-08 09:49:05
bishop

Did they ever have Samus on that show? The only chars that stick out in my mind is Simon being a fruit, Mega Man or/and Icarus having a really annoying high pitched voice.

I don't think Samus ever made an appearance, actually. Been a long time and all, mind you, but I still remember Icarus had the terrible high-pitched voice, Megaman had a pseudo-low/gravelly voice. Moreover, they both had speech impediments, with Icarus saying "-icus" at the end of every sentence, and Megaman saying things like "That's mega bad" constantly. Fucking. Constantly.

Man, 80s cartoons were terrible. Photographic memory is highly overrated.

godZero

The counterpart: just bought Serious Sam 2 yesterday. It's a good example of simple, but fun game. It just blows me away. And guess what: this game will sell much more than DX...

Guess what else? It retails for half the price. Sales numbers mean jack all without dinero taken into account.

I was bitter and cynical before it was cool.
#26 by Terata
2002-03-08 10:01:01
It's criminal what they did to Simon.  They turned him into some sort of demented airhead biplane pilot, or something.  The show DID have an eggplant wizard as a regular though, so you've got to give it some credit.

Considering Mother Brain was the main bad guy, you'd think Samus would've been around... but Bailey's right in that I don't remember ever seeing her.
#27 by PD
2002-03-08 10:03:35
I just had a thought (Cheers erupt in the background)

I was thinking that the next game I'd like to play would have to have a persistent gameworld (FPs's need not apply). Some of the oldest games I enjoyed were where my actions left an indelible mark upon the surface of the game.

Then I thought, why do people like the Sims?... It's a persistent world.

The Sims doesn't have to take up too much time, you can just jump in & take up from where you left your own personal soap opera. The house you've built, the relationships you've wrecked, all the accessories you burn.

I don't play as many games as I used to, I've played a  of games, and most games fail to spark any real excitement for me, the drive to sit own & not move for hours on end.

I spend more time surfing than locating CD's to boot. The thing I see driving more normal people away from gaming is the time investment. Just how long must you play to be good at Quake3? UT is easy to jump into, but I would never have looked at it, until a network game session one day.

The games I play most would be Train Despatcher, Shisen-sho and a nifty Jigsaw program called BigJig. These are games I can abandon within seconds (I have 3 kids).

I'm more excited by Dynasty Warriors 3 coming to Oz than Half Life 2, I have to order Europa Universalis 2 in from Canada because they own't sell it here (Number 1 ohas only been out a week).

I'm waiting for another RPG like Suikoden. Persistent world gaming.

Remember, once we pull the pin, Mr Grenade is no longer our friend.
#28 by Bailey
2002-03-08 10:11:26
Terata

The show DID have an eggplant wizard as a regular though, so you've got to give it some credit.

Lest we forget King Hippo.

PD

I'm more excited by Dynasty Warriors 3 coming to Oz

You know how some games set the rule that you must rent before you buy? DW3 is one of those games. I never played any of the previous ones, but this one basically could've been summed up in taping the attack button down and moving your character around with one finger. Multiplayer was a bit more fun, but still.

I was bitter and cynical before it was cool.
#29 by godZero
2002-03-08 10:39:14
godzero@gmx.de
#25:

DX was in a bargain bin two months after the release, so I think the price is not the reason. Besides, if I like something, I'd gladly pay double the price.
#30 by godZero
2002-03-08 10:47:26
godzero@gmx.de
BTW, happy International Women Day, girls (are there any here except Caryn?)
#31 by Bailey
2002-03-08 11:03:24
godZero

DX was in a bargain bin two months after the release, so I think the price is not the reason. Besides, if I like something, I'd gladly pay double the price.

Who's your choreographer? Cause it was really impressive how you just danced around the issue.

I was bitter and cynical before it was cool.
#32 by bishop
2002-03-08 11:05:23
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
Serious Sam 2 was fun, but I only could go through it once.

I'll buy the third, because I want to see what happens and such, but is it a great game?

Hell no.

Good? Sure.

but not great.

As for Samus in Captain N, I do believe she made a brief (one episode) appearance.

One of the end ones I think, a jungle world with donkey kong and everyone -almost- beating Mbrain but not quite.

Don't know if you know this (probably), but the eggplant wizard was from Kid Icarus.

It's cool how they paired up the villains and heroes, but it does seem odd that King Hippo (punch out) and Donkey Kong (ahem.) didn't have counterparts.

Would have been odd to have Mario in there, and I guess they thought no one knew who Stanley was.

If you're about to die, ask yourself the following question:
#33 by godZero
2002-03-08 11:10:25
godzero@gmx.de
#31:

      ??????
#34 by godZero
2002-03-08 11:46:52
godzero@gmx.de
#32 bishop:

SerSam2 isn't a great game per se, but it is a great game _in_comparison_ to the bunch of games that came out in last two years IMHO.
#35 by bishop
2002-03-08 11:50:36
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
I can't say, I didn't buy most of them.

of course, that in itself would normally speak volumes for sam2, but can you believe it, I bought the game for it's story?

If you're about to die, ask yourself the following question:
#36 by PD
2002-03-08 11:52:16
#28 GodZero

The game IS very repetitive, but I got hooked on Dynasty Warriors 2, where I got to run around like a lunatic, and kill lots of people.

We refer to the game as "Famous Chinese Psychopaths"..  There is some skill involved in keeping alive in some areas of the levels, knowing who to kill & how. I've never seen anything like it on the PC, & it was the major reason I bought a PS2, besides GT3 A-Spec.

I have a demo for #3, (yet to play) & will probably rent it on your advice, seeing as I already own 2.

Remember, once we pull the pin, Mr Grenade is no longer our friend.
#37 by godZero
2002-03-08 11:52:47
godzero@gmx.de
It was all about crazy action for me.
#38 by PD
2002-03-08 12:38:54
#37 GodZero

Did you play it all the way through? As much of a game as it is, it involves some tactical thinking to proceed. Eliminate Sergeants to send minions packing, Guard Captains to shut off enemy reinforcements, Eliminate characters to demoralise and get powerups.

Not a brain squeezer, but fun for all the family :)

Remember, once we pull the pin, Mr Grenade is no longer our friend.
#39 by godZero
2002-03-08 12:51:56
godzero@gmx.de
I just bought it yesterday and finished the third level. It'll take some time, 'cause I'm gonna take it easy in order to enjoy the visuals, which are overwhelming IMHO.
#40 by Darkseid-D
2002-03-08 13:26:48
rogerboal@hotmail.com
serious sam 1/2 become seriously dull, yay Ive killed 878232 monsters and my reward is spawing 878233 more !

play it in bursts of no more than one hour at a time (more if youre co-oping it) otherwise it becomes just -dull-.




Deus Ex was much much much much much broader in scope than Serious sam, to compare the two is to mangle an analogy comparing 'See the cat sit on the Mat' to the Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien.


Ds

Never argue with an idiot, theyll drag you down onto their level, then beat you with experience.
#41 by Post-It
2002-03-08 14:25:46
keithlee@speakeasy.net
More questions:
What type of interface do you want in a FP or third person game? I am concerned about these two game types because you actually control a character. What has frustrated you in other games? What situations were you presented with, that caused you to say "bullshit" because if you were actually there, you handle the situation completely different. What action (jump, push, pull, carry, etc) was missing that forced you to do something different instead of what you intuitivly wanted to do?
#42 by deadlock
2002-03-08 14:44:40
http://www.deadlocked.org/
godZero:
I thought the controls were too complicated for a first person game and the beginning was, well, boring.

The only extra keys that I used in addition  to the normal FPS ones were for looking around corners and toggling scope/laser. All of the other keys were standard FPS fair, so I don't really see how the controls could be regarded as complicated. As for the beginning: I loved it. It was a neat way to drop you into the game and right from the get-go you were encouraged to adopt a playing style. I remember taking around two hours to sneak around the statue of liberty; painstakingly following guards so that I could take them out at their most vulnerable and when there was no-one to see; shitting myself once I realised that the tranq darts take a few seconds to take effect and that there was a real danger that the enemy would be alerted. Top-notch stuff.

godZero:
Most people just want to relax, not to think. DX required a little bit different thinking, which is what many, many people are not capable of. That's why DeusEx didn't sell as much as it should have.

I have to say that I disagree with that asseriont. I think DeusEx didn't sell because the people who should have been pushing it were just going 'people don't like to think, this won't sell, we'll push this other crap instead'. Plus, of course, the unfortunate association with Ion Storm, Dallas. People enjoy a challenge, people like to be stimulated; they might think they don't, but they do. They just need to be pushed in the right direction a little.

it's alright to say things can only get better - you haven't lost yer brand new sweater...
#43 by deadlock
2002-03-08 14:45:25
http://www.deadlocked.org/
asseriont ?

fucking hell, i'm turning into Jeet :P

it's alright to say things can only get better - you haven't lost yer brand new sweater...
#44 by Dinglehoffen
2002-03-08 15:19:34
Fanny Fungus
Mario 64 is for prepubescent Peter-Pan syndrome cases. If running around jumping on things that go "boink" and sliding around on ice is fun, then someone needs to show you the world of games.

Heeeeeerrrrree's DINGLEHOFFEN!!!!!
#45 by godZero
2002-03-08 15:32:23
godzero@gmx.de
#42:

What I meant by "complicated" is that it was complicated from the point of view of an average Joe Doe. When such person gets a first person game (avoiding the term shooter), they just want to run arround and, like, shoot things. DX controls caused kinda system overload in their heads, 'cause they had to push too many buttons in order to do things. You need to be precise for aiming, jumping, etc. AND you need to use many buttons for the interface/commands direct access. If it was a role playing game, they'd have their mouse icons an wouldn't need precision and quickness. Most buyers are either FPS players OR point-and-click players, so the game didn't have any target audience, exceptions being people like us who want more from a game than Sims or Asteroids.
#46 by UncleJeet
2002-03-08 15:36:15
Deadlock!  EXTREME SHUSHNESS IS REQUIRED BY YOU WITHOUT DELAY!

  Yeah, yeah....The crimes against the language that I've been committing lately are beyond comprehension.  Well, maybe never sleeping has something to do with it, but then again it could just be sunspots.  Solar flares.  That damnable BOWSER, KING OF THE KOOPAS!  He plagues my dreams.

I'm fighting terrorism by playing violent video games!
#47 by godZero
2002-03-08 15:36:45
godzero@gmx.de
#41:

A sensor suit would be nice. Controlling speed by changing the angle of your upper body, jumping by stretching your legs, and hands vould be visible in a 3D display of your helmet, and you could use the menus or weapons or do whatever with them. Maybe some day.

Even beter would be controlling everything by simple thoughts :-)
#48 by Martin
2002-03-08 15:39:09
http://www.mocol.nu
I.... never played mario 64.






I'll go join LPMiller now.

-- Martin
"Burger me!"
#49 by godZero
2002-03-08 15:39:50
godzero@gmx.de
And: the suit would let you feel all the weapon hits (mildly, of course), making the whole thing highly interactive...
#50 by UncleJeet
2002-03-08 15:40:07
#44 - Dinglehoffen:

  And people that say nonsensical stuff like "prepubescent Peter Pan syndrome"  (little boys that want to be little boys again, so they never grow up?) and can't play Mario because they have to be "l33t" and "cool" need to discover the world of games.  Because, well, chances are you only recently emerged from dipers and are still excited when you see Sophita's multi colored panty wardrobe in Soul Caliber.

  Fortunately, I've been around long enough, and played enough games, that most of the "gritty, hard hitting, *mature* titles come across as being nothing more than a sad attempt to emboy the polygonal representation of pubescent boy fantasies.

  Taking all that into account, maybe I'm just comfortable playing "kiddie" games because I get laid a helluva lot more than you.  Or maybe I'm just being silly.  Who knows?!

I'm fighting terrorism by playing violent video games!
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