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T O P I C
Tribes 2 Engine, Anyone?
March 14th 2001, 14:55 CET by Morn

Ever wanted to make your own 3D game? You can now get a license for the engine that powers <i>Tribes 2</i> for just $100 -- the only drawback is, you'll be required to publish your game through <a href="http://www.garagegames.com">GarageGames</a> (a "virtual" company founded by Jeff Tunnell, Tim Gift and Rick Overman of Dynamix fame).

Here's a c&p of the <a href="http://www.garagegames.com/index.php?sec=mg&mod=resource&page=view&qid=589">original press release</a>:

<b>GARAGEGAMES ANNOUNCES LICENSING OF SIERRA'S TRIBES 2 TECHNOLOGY ENGINE</b>

EUGENE, OREGON - March 13, 2001 - GarageGames announces a historic agreement to sell and license the technology engine powering Sierra's Tribes 2 to independent game makers world-wide. The agreement gets the source code into the hands of game makers around the world, plus gives them a chance to get their products published in the traditional "box retail" channel.

GarageGames, a pioneering on-line game publisher, officially launched its site at http://www.garagegames.com, in October, 2000 with services such as an on-line game development jobs marketplace and a game making resource portal. GarageGames' mission is to provide independent game makers with tools, technology, education, team building, and a market - whatever they need - to make and sell great games.

"GarageGames is being built by professional game makers who are committed to publishing truly original and exciting products. This deal with Sierra is an example of our vision of providing game makers with state-of-the-art tools as well as how we will help our developers find a market for their games," said Jeff Tunnell, founder and President of GarageGames.

"Our version of the Tribes 2 technology, christened the V12 Engine, will have all of the Tribes 2 specific intellectual property, such as models, skins, and WON.net encryption removed before the source code is released for purchase at our site after the Computer Game Developer's Conference in late March. Soon after that, we will release a demo, example source code, and begin our own set of improvements in order to keep the technology on the cutting edge, " said Rick Overman, founder and Chief Technology Officer.

In addition to licensing the technology to GarageGames, stellar games that sell on the GarageGames site, may be given the opportunity to be distributed through Sierra's retail distribution channel. "Sierra sees this as a wonderful opportunity to leverage our investment in the Tribes 2 technology to a world wide base of innovative developers. We see GarageGames as a farm team that can bring many ideas to life," says Mark Hood, Sr. VP of Development at Sierra.

GarageGames will be selling sub-licenses to the source code for the V12 Technology at its website for $100. In addition, developers must agree to publish their products through the GarageGames website and give them the rights to represent the products in the retail channel. Tim Gift, founder and Director of Development, says, "For less the price of a graphics editor, developers can use a state of the art, AAA technology platform that let's them bring their gaming vision to life. This is an incredible opportunity!"

Sierra On-Line, Inc. http://www.sierra.com, a subsidiary of Vivendi Universal Publishing and part of the Vivendi Universal Games division, is one of the original developers and largest worldwide publishers of interactive entertainment and productivity software. Sierra is renowned for releasing critically acclaimed and award winning titles that represent a wide variety of computer entertainment on both next generation console and PC platforms.

GarageGames is the brainchild of Tunnell, Overman, Gift, and Mark Frohnmayer (still at Dynamix while completing Tribes 2). Tunnell, the founder and former executive director of Dynamix (a division of Sierra On-Line) has designed, produced, or directed more than 70 games. Overman, Gift, and Frohnmayer were the key technology architects behind Starsiege, TRIBES (1999 Online Game of the Year -- Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences), and TRIBES 2. GarageGames is located in Eugene, OR, USA.

<a href="http://www.garagegames.com/index.php?sec=mg&mod=technology&page=faq">Their FAQ</a> answers some more questions.
C O M M E N T S
Home » Topic: Tribes 2 Engine, Anyone?

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#1 by "Matt Gallant"
2001-03-14 14:59:43
mg@tmbg.org http://truemeaningoflife.com
What a bargain!

Whoops, I mean:

Hello 0% royalty check!
#2 by "Jafd"
2001-03-14 15:03:05
JnoAspamFpleaseD@whatthefuck.com http://jafd.isfuckingbrilliant.com
It's $100; but you got to keep putting quarters in it to take screenshots.
#3 by "Matt Gallant"
2001-03-14 15:08:49
mg@tmbg.org http://truemeaningoflife.com
The initial drop of the V12 will be the source code from the shipping version of Tribes 2 with the game specific code stripped out. Though this will be a bit of a tar ball, this is an un-heard of opportunity. For $100, you get the source to the engine of a major product from a major game producer, within weeks of the games release!


Essentially, what you get for free with other games, yet you have to publish your mod (because all you can make is a mod) through them and if they decide to sell it they get to keep 50% of the on-line sales and 20% of the boxed sales.
#4 by "ilian"
2001-03-14 15:13:24
chrism@gearboxsoftware.com http://www.gearboxsoftware.com
They are giving away full _engine_ source Matt.  
SDKs for most commercial games (Half-Life, Quake2, Quake3, Dues Ex, etc), are game logic code only, and contain no engine source. There is a world of difference.
#5 by "funkdrunk"
2001-03-14 15:14:22
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
#3 Matt Gallant


Essentially, what you get for free with other games


Is it?  The game code is free for quake3, but the engine code is 175k.  I've interpeted this press release to read, "We're not supplying the game code, but the engine code for $100".  Which means that if I want to add inverse kinematics to the engine, I can.

Funk
#6 by "Matt Gallant"
2001-03-14 15:20:23
mg@tmbg.org http://truemeaningoflife.com
I was very hasty in adding my comments and apologize.
#7 by "Morn"
2001-03-14 15:22:24
morn@planetcrap.com http://www.planetcrap.com
#3 "Matt Gallant" wrote...
Essentially, what you get for free with other games, yet you have to publish your mod (because all you can make is a mod) through them and if they decide to sell it they get to keep 50% of the on-line sales and 20% of the boxed sales.

Well, they do give you the full engine source code (and tools source as well, I think).

- Morn
#8 by "Tom Cleghorn"
2001-03-14 15:27:26
tc10@spam-b-gawrne.st-andrews.ac.uk http://www.mornography.com/tomc/
Hm... this is a step in the right direction, I think. Reminds me slightly of things like the Shoot-em-up Construction Kit and so forth.
With the number of hobbyist-type game developers around these days, this'll be a good way for those who deserve it to get some exposure.
#9 by "Matt Gallant"
2001-03-14 15:27:29
mg@tmbg.org http://truemeaningoflife.com
Morn (#7):
#3 "Matt Gallant" wrote...

Essentially, what you get for free with other games, yet you have to publish your mod (because all you can make is a mod) through them and if they decide to sell it they get to keep 50% of the on-line sales and 20% of the boxed sales.

Well, they do give you the full engine source code (and tools source as well, I think).

- Morn


Yes, I wanted some eggs for breakfast but I ended up getting them on my face. Isn't there an edit or delete post feature here? :)
#10 by "Morn"
2001-03-14 15:27:48
morn@planetcrap.com http://www.planetcrap.com
I only see one problem with their business model: they're overestimating the ability of the would-be developer kids out there. I can just speak for myself, but if I knew I was able to make an awesome game, I'd definitely not go with a (so far) unproven (and virtual) company like GarageGames.

I currently assume that all they'll get is a handful of kids who spend $100 on the engine, and then never release anything that resembles a complete (or even good) game.

What I like about GarageGames though is how they don't do the usual nasty Startup stuff; they're self-funded and have no offices - so they probably don't spend $50 million of venture capital on business class flights to Europe, either. That makes me trust them a bit more than most other companies who mention the word "historic" in their press releases.

- Morn
#11 by "funkdrunk"
2001-03-14 15:33:39
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
#10 Morn

I only see one problem with their business model: they're overestimating the ability of the would-be developer kids out there.


Morn, I dunno if I see it that way.  If 10,000 people download the source, and of that 10k, 1% create a game for upload, that's 1000 games.  Of those 1000 games, if 1% make a game worth publishing, then they've won.  They've got the money from the 10000 people up front.  That should pay for the bandwidth to carry the 1000 games people make.  And if the 100 games worth publishing make money, it's all gravy.

Doesn't sound like a bad plan from the GarageGames perspective.

Funk
#12 by "circle"
2001-03-14 15:35:01
circle@bellsouth.net
#3

I haven't looked into this much yet, but I'm guessing that for this to be any
big deal, it must include the rendering/networking/mesh manipulation code; this
is something that only companies that license the engine usually get.  In fact,
with the Quake gamex86.dll source, you ONLY get the game specific code [for mods],
none of the engine/rendering code.  This sounds like a great learning tool for budding game
programmers.   I could be wrong though.

†circle-
#13 by "Whisp"
2001-03-14 15:35:55
How will you distribute my game?
GarageGames is an on-line distribution company. All games created with the V12 engine must be posted on the GarageGames site. Most will be free, but those that show promise will be moved into the "pay bin". From that point, the best games will have an opportunity to be brought into retail distribution through our network of publishing partners.

As far as I can tell, there's no way to tell if your game will actually be published for profit.  The final decision rests completely in the hands of GarageGames.  Assembling a salaried team to take advantage of this offer would be a seriously bad move - there's no guarantee you'll ever see any money.  Don't quit you day job.  

-Whisp
#14 by "circle"
2001-03-14 15:36:47
circle@bellsouth.net
oops, by the time I posted, 50 other people said the same thing- doh!

†circle-
#15 by "ilian"
2001-03-14 15:38:22
chrism@gearboxsoftware.com http://www.gearboxsoftware.com
Your math is a little off Funk ;)

1% of 10,000 == 100
1% of 100 == 1

And, i think those percentage estimates your making are accurate..
For every 10,000 purchases, one game worth publishing.
But, for the hobby developer, this is an awesome opportunity.
#16 by "Morn"
2001-03-14 15:39:16
morn@planetcrap.com http://www.planetcrap.com
#11 "funkdrunk" wrote...
If 10,000 people download the source

I assume you meant "buy", not "download". Anyway: I really, really, really don't believe that 10,000 people will buy the engine. I don't think it will be even close to that. But I may be wrong. If I am, good for GarageGames. :)

- Morn
#17 by "Tom Cleghorn"
2001-03-14 15:40:02
tc10@spam-b-gawrne.st-andrews.ac.uk http://www.mornography.com/tomc/
Whisp:
Assembling a salaried team to take advantage of this offer would be a seriously bad move - there's no guarantee you'll ever see any money. Don't quit you day job.

True, but that's not really the major advantage of this plan - it's an exposure thing. If Joe Blow happens to have a natural talent for game design, it's just possible that this would be his route into the industry.
#18 by "funkdrunk"
2001-03-14 15:40:05
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
#15 Ilian

Ooops.  You can tell I wasn't a math major. ;)

Thanks

Funk
#19 by "funkdrunk"
2001-03-14 15:40:53
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
#11 Morn,

You're right. I meant buy.  

Funk
#20 by "funkdrunk"
2001-03-14 15:43:37
jflavius@bellatlantic.net
#16 Morn,

I dunno, guy.  I mentioned this deal to a friend of mine, and he's already found 5 guys who want to buy the engine.  People will fall into 2 camps.  Those who buy the engine, start to read the code, and put it down, and those who continue on to try to create something.  People are excited because of the price point.  Hell, I gave up attempting to write games 7 years ago, and I've even considered buying it...

Funk
#21 by "LPMiller"
2001-03-14 15:44:25
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
Your math is a little off Funk ;)

1% of 10,000 == 100
1% of 100 == 1


But isn't just 1 big selling game the dream?

Never know, they might discover the next John Carmack.

Or baring that, the next Killcreek...ack, someone stop them, NOW!!
#22 by "Morn"
2001-03-14 15:48:58
morn@planetcrap.com http://www.planetcrap.com
#21 "LPMiller" wrote...
Never know, they might discover the next John Carmack.

I'm pretty sure that if there is a next John Carmack, he'll write the engine himself. :)

- Morn
#23 by "asspennies"
2001-03-14 15:51:09
asspennies@asspennies.org http://www.asspennies.org/
#17 "Tom Cleghorn" wrote...
True, but that's not really the major advantage of this plan - it's an exposure thing. If Joe Blow happens to have a natural talent for game design, it's just possible that this would be his route into the industry.


In other words, GarageGames is hoping to catch lightning in a bottle like Valve did with Counter-Strike - and are hoping that CS's meteoric rise was not an industry fluke.

I don't know how successful this will be.
#24 by "Sgt Hulka"
2001-03-14 15:57:09
Sgt_Hulka@Hulka.com http://www.hulka.com
I don't know, $100 bucks is a bit pricey don't cha think? ;)

This is a positive move in my book and I'll at least take a look at the engine.  The only drawback to me are the strings attached and that could ultimately be their achilles heel.

WWBGD


(Note: WWBGD = What Would Billy Gilman Do?)
#25 by "jason"
2001-03-14 16:00:12
jason@loonygames.com http://www.bluesnews.com/
In other words, GarageGames is hoping to catch lightning in a bottle like Valve did with Counter-Strike - and are hoping that CS's meteoric rise was not an industry fluke.


Yep, that's it exactly. They throw the stuff out there and hope that it produces a Counter-Strike. I think it's an interesting experiment...although free engines have been available for some time. Any mod author want to tell us how this improves over the Genesis 3D or other open-source engine releases?

-jason
#26 by "circle"
2001-03-14 16:09:42
circle@bellsouth.net
$100?  Chump change for learning materials.  I just plopped
down $70 for a hardcover Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice.
Not to mention all of the math books that I've purchased in the last 2 years
to brush up on linear algebra/trig/calc.

$100 for a fully function 3d engine is about the best educational value
I can imagine.  I'm going to buy it the second that it's available.

†circle-
#27 by "Gunp01nt"
2001-03-14 16:10:34
supersimon33@hotmail.com http://planetp01nt.tmfweb.nl
I think that being able to use the V12 engine, is a good think if you're a wannabe game developer. Everyone in here only think about whether the people who pay 100 bux for the SDK, get dough for their product.

Fact is that the PC gaming market is very hard to penetrate for a beginning developer. This way they at least get the chance to prove themselves. So what if they don't get paid so much if GarageGames decides to publish their game? 99% of the games made with V12 are gonna be rejected anyway, so what's the fuss about? are you really expecting everybody who makes a game with the V12 engine will automatically do a good job that deserves alot of credit?

Of course, Garage Games IS also in it for the money (if someone makes a killer game, they can make k's out of it) but they're also providing an excellent on-step for beginning developers.
And if someone makes a REALLY leet game, they're gonna be spotted and hired by other publishers anyway, even before their V12-game is ready!
#28 by "Erik"
2001-03-14 16:10:46
Hell, even if you don't plan to make a game with it, it's a pretty amazing reference work.  Technical books and textbooks routinely cost a hundred buck or more.  Plus, aside from the hundred dollar entrance fee - which is less than a pair of shoes and technical books and textbooks - the terms don't appear any more restricitve than the publishing limitations put on serious mod authors.
#29 by "Bracket"
2001-03-14 16:23:27
thebracket@yahoo.com http:/www.tsghelp.com/
Didn't Lithtech announce something like this a while ago? I thought that Garage were licensing Lith... anyone know what happened to that? For that matter, are the Lith people still alive? They seem to have vanished off the media radar so far as I can tell.
#30 by "Sgt Hulka"
2001-03-14 16:41:45
Sgt_Hulka@Hulka.com http://www.hulka.com
In Post 28, Erik spewed forth the following;
"which is less than a pair of shoes "



Where do you buys shoes dude?  Macys?

I get mine at Shoe Carnival for like 12 bucks.  Then again, they are clown shoes.
#31 by "Gunp01nt"
2001-03-14 16:46:00
supersimon33@hotmail.com http://planetp01nt.tmfweb.nl
doesn't the army supply your shoes, hulka? :)
#32 by "Ghost in my Shell"
2001-03-14 16:46:03
This all assuming there will be documentation and all this good helpful shit we think will be in there.

I had a friend ask if I wanted to make a game now with this mod, and since I dont have time to just make a "game" without quiting my job, I would like to know how much I would make if I am part of that 1%.
#33 by "Ghost in my Shell"
2001-03-14 16:47:47
mod = engine
#34 by "Gunp01nt"
2001-03-14 16:52:22
supersimon33@hotmail.com http://planetp01nt.tmfweb.nl
there we go again: it's all about the money!
Remember that newbie gamedevs aren't in the position to make demands, they should be glad somebody looks at the stuff they make...
but if you consider yourself a big-shot, why even make use of the V12 engine?

And it's a choice: either your job or the game. You can't expect to do both at the same time and get paid in full!
#35 by "Warren Marshall"
2001-03-14 16:55:21
warren@epicgames.com www.epicgames.com
jason (#25):
Any mod author want to tell us how this improves over the Genesis 3D or other open-source engine releases?

Well, the primary improvement would be that you're getting a proven game engine that was used in a hit video game (which Tribes2 will undoubtably be, despite people's bitching), as opposed to this "free thing" you found on the web.


What I don't get is why they aren't including the game specific code ... why hand someone the engine, and not give them code that shows them how to make a game with it (like giving them a car with no keys)?  Epic gives licensees all game specific code as well as the engine ... you just can't ship it as-is, or use any of the art assets we include (without explicit permission).

I think it would be fairly important to show someone how to do stuff ... like if someone handed you a DLL with the Quake3 engine's core functions and a LIB to link to, you might get excited at first, but once that passes ... what are you going to do with it?

If they want good games to come out of this, they better have a plan in place to help people get going ...

Including the game specific code would be a good way to facilitate that ... because if they get a lot of takers at $100, without any info on how to get going, they're going to be asking the Tribes2 team a LOT of questions.  If they want that support nightmare, all the more power to them.  But if people have examples and such in front of them, they are apt to at least try it on their own before asking questions.
#36 by "Katherine Anna Kang"
2001-03-14 17:07:23
#17 by Tom Cleghorn

True, but that's not really the major advantage of this plan - it's an exposure thing. If Joe Blow happens to have a natural talent for game design, it's just possible that this would be his route into the industry.


To be honest, for someone to get noticed (who really happens to have a natural talent), and get their chance at the industry, making mods for the Quakes, Half-Life, Unreals (and its derivatives) is much, much better... and no need to pay $100.  In just raw numbers, people play those games more, there's more press, the likelihood of getting your work seen by decision makers are greater, and there's more hire possibilities.  Look at how many people have gotten jobs by doing great work on their mods.

If you're a stickler for having access to the source code (whether for educational purposes or for creating a brand new game), there's the Quake and Doom source that's available for FREE and you don't just get part of the code, you get everything.  You have the source, the tools, and the community which may be of assistance (with info or team members).

Carmack released the source code for this main reason - to give up and coming talent (who have the drive and focus) an opportunity to build something cool and share it with the community.

The Quake source is a great learning tool and there's so much that can be done with it.  The original Quake engine is still an amazingly powerful engine.  It may not be cutting edge, lead the industry type of engine, but it's a really great engine.  It's what started the on-line game thing that everyone knows of today.  It's the grand-daddy of them all.  If you know anything about game engines, you know that going from 2D to 3D is a major, major task.  Pile networking on top of that, and it's not a job for mere humans.  Having the Quake source out there for someone to look at is almost like having cheat notes.  It's right there in front of your nose.  You just have to go out there and get it, create a cool game with it, and share it with the rest of the world.
#37 by "jason"
2001-03-14 17:15:29
jason@loonygames.com http://www.bluesnews.com/
What I don't get is why they aren't including the game specific code ... why hand someone the engine, and not give them code that shows them how to make a game with it (like giving them a car with no keys)?


Well that would be because that stuff is owned by Sierra/Dynamix, and not GarageGames - it's not theirs to give away.

I wouldn't be surprised if they included some kind of game demo though. Not Tribes 2 or anything, but some kind of technology showcase for new developers.

-jason
#38 by "Ghost in my Shell"
2001-03-14 17:23:03
Sure I could do a mod for insertgamehere to show off work.

However, if the T2 engine actually has some decent documenation/tools, it might be better off to develop something with that instead of some other engine where to get real materials costs real money.

Also when someone has a chance to make money off of my work, I wanna know how much im going to get.
#39 by "Warren Marshall"
2001-03-14 17:25:15
warren@epicgames.com www.epicgames.com
jason (#37):
Well that would be because that stuff is owned by Sierra/Dynamix, and not GarageGames - it's not theirs to give away.

No, not game content ... game specific code.  If they're giving away the engine, it would make sense to include the game code to show people how to use it.  Game assets (art, models, etc) shouldn't be included ... that's on your Tribes2 CD.
#40 by "Warren Marshall"
2001-03-14 17:28:01
warren@epicgames.com www.epicgames.com
Katherine Anna Kang (#36):
To be honest, for someone to get noticed (who really happens to have a natural talent), and get their chance at the industry, making mods for the Quakes, Half-Life, Unreals (and its derivatives) is much, much better... and no need to pay $100. In just raw numbers, people play those games more, there's more press, the likelihood of getting your work seen by decision makers are greater, and there's more hire possibilities. Look at how many people have gotten jobs by doing great work on their mods.

Agreed.  Making a mod is a better idea if you're looking to get hired.  Game developers notice good mods, especially ones made for THEIR games.  :)  There are lots of free games released on the net, but I rarely download any of them.  I think it would be tough to get noticed that way.

UNLESS you directly submit that game to a developer and ask for a job ... then they'll look at it of course.  But even then, a high quality mod would go a lot further.  If you can show a game developer, "Look, I made this highly innovative mod using your engine.  Why couldn't YOU do this!?" ... well, that has a lot higher impact.  You one-upped them.  :)
#41 by "Gabe"
2001-03-14 17:28:11
gakruger@hotmail.com http://www.refracted.com
Quake source is not really free. It is GPLed, which actually imposes restrictions. It is a great learning tool, but if you use any of the code, you have to release your code too.
#42 by "MaverickUK"
2001-03-14 17:28:21
peter.bridger@tpg.co.uk
I like the way Epic included most the Unreal Glide code in UT, really gives it that retro feel ;)

--
Mav
#43 by "MaverickUK"
2001-03-14 17:32:40
peter.bridger@tpg.co.uk
Success stories?

Counter-Strike - Thanx to support from Value (admittedly to line their own pockets, but a good business move)

TFC - Another game MOD success...

Gunman - ditto

---
Apart from these all bring Value MOD examples *ginge* it shows some of the most successful recent 'amatuer' games have come from MODs.
MODs allow for easy extenability to a game engine, so the designers can concentrate on the gameplay, rather than the game engine.

I'm not saying the Tribes2 engine deal won't breed any good games, but why struggle with Tribes2, when there are much easier alternatives out there.

--
Mav
#44 by "Ghost in my Shell"
2001-03-14 17:34:27
Actually reading the site, its 50/50 so hell thats a better deal then I thought...
#45 by "Morn"
2001-03-14 17:35:57
morn@planetcrap.com http://www.planetcrap.com
A general question - why (and I'm really just asking for the reasons) do people always say that a game development newcomer needs to be "seen"? I may be totally wrong, but as I see it, it takes two things to become a (commercially and, at least to some extent, artistically successful game developer):

1) Skill

2) Ambition

There are developers out there with ambition, but no skill; like the "I'm Carmack 2.0!" kids who, for example, would buy the Tribes 2 engine for $100 and then quickly drop it because don't quite understand it. I know this sounds harsh, but why would we even *want* them or their games to be seen?

Then there are people with skill, but no ambition (at least commercially) -- you know, like those people from the "scene" who code the most amazing 3D demos (demos, not demos), but have no real interest in writing an actual game.

So what about the people who have both? Every time I hear something about them needing exposure, or having to be "really lucky to break into the industry", I'm getting the feeling people believe it's all up to luck -- I believe it's not. If you have skills and ambition and make a GREAT game, it WILL get exposure, people WILL check it out, and you WILL be noticed by the big players. If this does not happen, the reason very likely is that your game stinks.

I really dislike the idea of "breaking into the industry" -- I believe that when you make a decent game and have the intention to make money off it, you ARE the industry. I just think people have a somewhat distorted notion of what the industry really is.

Rant over :>

- Morn
#46 by "MaverickUK"
2001-03-14 17:39:23
peter.bridger@tpg.co.uk
'Getting into the industry' isn't a one man game. The best games come from the best teams, who are made up of a fine balance of great level designers, art folks, coders and the right people in charge the manage this talent.

I don't think even the John 'Is the Sun Shinning out my ass' Carmack could hack it, without a firm team to support him


BUT I hav GREAT IDEAS FOR A GAME!"!! YOU ARE A GHOST WITH GUNS AND THE WORLD HAS TO BE SAVED BY YOU AND YOU HAVE A CAR AND A ROCKET!!!!...*ahem* sorry!
--
Mav
#47 by "Ghost in my Shell"
2001-03-14 17:41:37
"BUT I hav GREAT IDEAS FOR A GAME!"!! YOU ARE A GHOST WITH GUNS AND THE WORLD HAS TO BE SAVED BY YOU AND YOU HAVE A CAR AND A ROCKET!!!!...*ahem* sorry!"

That would be Spectre from Twisted Metal for the psx ;-)
#48 by "Katherine Anna Kang"
2001-03-14 17:42:12
#41 by Gabe

Quake source is not really free. It is GPLed, which actually imposes restrictions. It is a great learning tool, but if you use any of the code, you have to release your code too.


It's 100% free when it comes to dollars.  However, it and its derivatives were meant to stay free.  The code must get released so that others can benefit from it also but any art/levels/etc. does not get put into this category.  So you could, very easily, do a game, release its source (as it is GPLed), but keep the art/levels proprietary.

But if you're stingy with any of the amended code, you can do what the folks did with Laser Arena and get a very low cost commercial license for the original DOOM/QUAKE source.  :)
#49 by "Sgt Hulka"
2001-03-14 17:45:10
Sgt_Hulka@Hulka.com http://www.hulka.com
In Post 45, Morn spewed forth the following;
"Rant over :>"


Me tosses Morn a Scooby Snack.

New Slogan, The Game Industry - An Army of One!


#50 by "jason"
2001-03-14 17:47:21
jason@loonygames.com http://www.bluesnews.com/
But if you're stingy with any of the amended code, you can do what the folks did with Laser Arena and get a very low cost commercial license for the original DOOM/QUAKE source. :)


Did LaserArena actually use some Doom source? I assumed it was all Quake 1.

-jason
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