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T O P I C
Good book? I couldn't pick it up!
December 26th 2000, 23:06 CET by Andy

There's a BBC story about books that are bought, but not read. The focus is on books given as gifts that the lucky recipient never wanted, but let's extend that a bit...

According to the BBC story, some of the most unread books are Ulysses by James Joyce, A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, and everything by Salman Rushdie.

This story really hit home with me, because one thing that infuriates me about myself is my habit of not finishing books. Even books that I like.

Just recently I've started reading, enjoyed, but then given up on Glamorama by Bret Easton Ellis, A Game We Play by Simona Vinci, Resurrection Day by Brendan DuBois, Birdman by Mo Hayder, and the first Harry Potter book by J.K. Rowling.

The only books I've finished in the last few years have been Hannibal by Thomas Harris, American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis, and the non-fiction On Writing by Stephen King.

This week I'm going to order Gerald's Game by Stephen King and, although I expect to like it, I'm sure I'll give up on it after a hundred pages or so. I know that there's very little chance of me finishing it, no matter how much I enjoy it.

I don't know why I'm like this. Just for some reason, I rarely finish books. It may be that I have high standards, or perhaps I'm just lazy -- after all, it does take effort to finish a book, especially if you're a slow reader, which I am.

Feel free to jump into this thread with any relevant comments, or your thoughts on what is discussed in the BBC story. But personally I'm most interested to know if any of you also have this annoying tendency to abandon books, even when you're enjoying them. Am I the only one who does this?
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#1 by "szcx"
2000-12-26 23:18:24
nedocze@hotmail.com
one thing that infuriates me about myself is my habit of not finishing books

what are the other things?
#2 by "Andy"
2000-12-26 23:25:05
andy@meejahor.com
<b>szcx</b> (#1):
<quote>
<quote>one thing that infuriates me about myself is my habit of not finishing books</quote>
what are the other things?
</quote>
I annoy stupid people.

Thanks for reminding me.
#3 by "spackbace"
2000-12-26 23:37:05
brian@cc.gatech.edu
sounds to me like you just have a short attention span.  The only time I don't finish books is when they suck.
#4 by "WarrenMarshall"
2000-12-26 23:48:36
warren@epicgames.com
Andy (#2):
I annoy stupid people.

Thanks for reminding me.

Of course.  Smart people would never be annoyed by anything you say since everything that comes out of your mouth is well informed, researched fact.

*wakes up in cold sweat*

---

Warren Marshall
Level Designer/Programmer/Corporate Shill
Epic Games (www.epicgames.com)<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#5 by "gimper"
2000-12-26 23:52:37
jeremyj@impactimaging.com
Don't waste your time with Gerald's Game.  IT should have ended about a hundred pages earlier.  Another tip, try short story collections (King has three or four)  Then by the one hundred page mark you'll have finished a couple of complete stories.
#6 by "Monkey_Butler"
2000-12-26 23:54:37
wash@sirius.com
Well, since stupid people are a subset of all people in general, Andy's statement can be regarded as true.
#7 by "errhead"
2000-12-26 23:57:35
err_head@yahoo.com
I have the same problem with most games.  The only time I don't finish a book I like is if I lose the book, but if i hit a jumping puzzle that is too frustrating then it's usually time to pull out another game, or play the game i'm having difficulty in another way, multiplayer, random map, quick combat, whatever.<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#8 by "Lucky"
2000-12-27 00:17:00
lucky@planetduke.com
BORING! Jesus.
#9 by "WarrenMarshall"
2000-12-27 00:24:08
warren@epicgames.com
Lucky (#8):
BORING! Jesus.

I don't find Jesus all that boring ...

---

Warren Marshall
Level Designer/Programmer/Corporate Shill
Epic Games (www.epicgames.com)<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#10 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 00:32:32
andy@meejahor.com
Warren, please don't. This site has been much better without the off-topic abuse so it would be a shame to start again. I'm sure you agree. If you've got it out of your system now then let's just leave it at that, okay? Thanks.
#11 by "daruma"
2000-12-27 01:12:15
daruma@twu.net
Actually, I have a friend who can't read books due to what you could call a short attention span. He reads a few sentances or paragraphs and then looses track of the story and starts to make up the rest himself :/

I myself used to read stacks of books myself, but lately I haven't found the time to just sit down a read a good book :(<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#12 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 01:42:18
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Interesting... (in direct contradiction to #8)...
Personally, I try to make a point of finishing every book I buy or receive. The only two I can think of that have bettered me in recent years were Catch 22 and On The Road. I'm still not sure why, but I just couldn't ever manage to finish either of them.
Thinking about it, I never finished William Golding's Rites of Passage either, although I intend to at some point in the future, since it seemed to be a Good Book (so to speak) - it was a course book last year, though, and I still threw out a storming essay about it in the exam, so that was OK :)
#13 by "szcx"
2000-12-27 01:45:50
nedocze@hotmail.com
I annoy stupid people.

Thanks for reminding me.

ooo, what a zinger... *yawn*

But personally I'm most interested to know if any of you also have this annoying tendency to abandon books

it happens less frequently now that i focus on ebooks (for Microsoft Reader).  i had been re-reading the dead-tree version of Candide on and off for a couple of years, but as soon as i got the ebook version, i finished it in a few days.  i just uploaded it to the Jornada and read a was able to pick up where i left off whenever i had a spare moment.
#14 by "szcx"
2000-12-27 01:47:34
nedocze@hotmail.com
bah.  preview is for losers.

"read a was able to" is yoda-speak for "was able to".
#15 by "cidhubie"
2000-12-27 01:49:14
swinemars@ns.sympatico.ca
TomC, how could you not finish "Catch-22"?    I've read through it three times and every time it grabbed me by the 'nads and would'nt let go until I finished.
#16 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 01:49:30
andy@meejahor.com
<b>TomC</b> (#12):
<quote>
The only two I can think of that have bettered me in recent years were <I>Catch 22</I> and <I>On The Road</I>. I'm still not sure why, but I just couldn't ever manage to finish either of them.
</quote>
Do you <i>want</i> to finish them? Or did you just lose interest, or lose track of the plot, etc? In my case, I'm usually enjoying the book, and I'll be reading it for half an hour or so each day for a few weeks, and then one day I'll just not bother picking it up... and that's it.
#17 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 01:51:47
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
i focus on ebooks

Evil, evil, evil. May you burn in the pit of Eamonn Holmes for that!
*summons Lesser Shade of Eric Morecambe Lvl 34 +3 for Gauntlets of Cooper to protect against Essence of Eamonn

Seriously though... what do people think of electronic 'books'? I can't see a future in them, myself, but I have a nagging doubt at the back of my head that this could just be wishful thinking. I really can't picture a world with no actual books. Personally, I think electronic 'books' are just a ploy by the publishing industry to start working on books in the same way as they do with music or software...
#18 by "12xu"
2000-12-27 01:53:32
mswitzer@insync.net
I've read catch-22 several times myself...great book..

lately I have been reading collections of essays, etc...
(The Ralph Nader Reader and The Angela Davis Reader at the moment) and I find I can always make it through them because after a finish each essay I feel like I have reached a good place to stop and I don't have to remember every detail from the last thing I read to enjoy and get a lot of the next one...

last novel I read would have probably been The Trial (I read it so often it is always safe to assume it's the last novel I read...)

However I never did finish that book on Nintendo that I started or all the issues of Transmetropolitan that I borrowed...

12xu
out<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#19 by "Barneyque"
2000-12-27 01:53:53
barneyque@hotmail.com
<b>#16</b> "Andy" wrote...
<quote><B>TomC</B> (#12):

<quote>
The only two I can think of that have bettered me in recent years were <I>Catch 22</I> and <I>On The Road</I>. I'm still not sure why, but I just couldn't ever manage to finish either of them.
</quote>
Do you <I>want</I> to finish them? Or did you just lose interest, or lose track of the plot, etc? In my case, I'm usually enjoying the book, and I'll be reading it for half an hour or so each day for a few weeks, and then one day I'll just not bother picking it up... and that's it.</quote>


And when you say, 'that's it', do you then move to another book, or just stop reading for a while?

It sounds like you just get tired of the act of reading moreso than the material your consuming. Perhaps you need to buy your books on cassette?  
<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#20 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 01:57:08
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Andy:
Do you want to finish them? Or did you just lose interest, or... {snip}

Well, I'm not entirely sure... as I say, I've never figured out why. Normally, even if I'm not enjoying a book, I'll still plough through it, just so as to be able to say 'That was crap' on the basis of a full reading... but with those two in particular, it just felt like they were dragging on and on, with little appreciable change in the amount of pages on top of my bookmark :) It might well have just been the authors' writing styles clashing with my own reading preferences on some subconscious level, or it might have been little green men moving my bookmark back to page 40 every night :) Who knows? Anyway, the end result is that I never finished either. I'd still like to, though.
#21 by "szcx"
2000-12-27 01:59:37
nedocze@hotmail.com
Seriously though... what do people think of electronic 'books'?

i love them.  especially with Reader and ClearType on the PocketPC.  the problem with ebooks on palm-sized pc's in the past was that they weren't very readable.  i couldn't sit down for a couple of hours and read them without getting a headache.  that's not an issue anymore.

I really can't picture a world with no actual books

there's no way ebooks will ever replace "real" books, they're just another delivery medium.  the Jornada plays MP3's and video too, but i won't be trashing my cd player or dvd any time soon :)

I think electronic 'books' are just a ploy by the publishing industry to start working on books in the same way as they do with music or software...

there are plenty of freely-available ebooks out there, and Microsoft have released the .LIT toolkit.  people are already converting the Project Gutenberg to LIT and other ebook formats.  it's all very cool.
#22 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:01:08
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Barneyque:
And when you say, 'that's it', do you then move to another book, or just stop reading for a while?

Generally, I'll just concentrate on other books. I usually have two or three on the go at once. Unusually enough, I actually only have one current book at the moment, Fun Run and other oxymorons by Joe Bennett. Good book, lots of fun - highly recommended (if you trust my recommendations, that is ;)
As for books on tape - nope. Never. It's my opinion that hearing prose read aloud locks you in too much to the reader's interpretation of it (the same effect as with films of books). Poetry's another matter, but I would never buy a novel on tape.
#23 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 02:02:31
andy@meejahor.com
<b>TomC</b> (#17):
<quote>
Seriously though... what do people think of electronic 'books'? I can't see a future in them, myself, but I have a nagging doubt at the back of my head that this could just be wishful thinking.
</quote>
Same here. I don't see them taking off, but that could be wishful thinking. For me, when I want to read something I go and sit on the bed with the cat curled up next to me. I can't imagine reading sat at a computer.

E-books will probably take off a bit more when there are more people using hand-helds, because they'll be more book-like, but we're still talking about a small market.
<quote>
I really can't picture a world with no actual <I>books</I>. Personally, I think electronic 'books' are just a ploy by the publishing industry to start working on books in the same way as they do with music or software...
</quote>
And also to cut down on the waste of paper, which is a good thing. But I'll always want to have a copy of a good book sat on my shelf, not on my PC.


<b>Barneyque</b> (#19):
<quote>
And when you say, 'that's it', do you then move to another book, or just stop reading for a while?
</quote>
I usually go straight on to something else. Most recently I was reading Resurrection Day, which is really, really good, but then I just gave up. Then I read about 10 pages of 1984 over a few nights, gave up on that too, and read On Writing in less than a week. (That's fast for me.)
<quote>
It sounds like you just get tired of the act of reading moreso than the material your consuming. Perhaps you need to buy your books on cassette?
</quote>
Don't think I haven't thought of that! :-)
#24 by "szcx"
2000-12-27 02:03:49
nedocze@hotmail.com
btw, you can get Microsoft Reader from here, books from here, and here.
#25 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 02:05:18
andy@meejahor.com
<b>TomC</b> (#22):
<quote>
As for books on tape - nope. Never. It's my opinion that hearing prose read aloud locks you in too much to the reader's interpretation of it (the same effect as with films of books).
</quote>
What about when the author reads it him/herself? I think Thomas Harris reads the Hannibal audio book, and I'd like to hear that even though I've already read the book. (And it's the best book I've read, BTW.)
#26 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:06:53
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
szcx:
people are already converting the Project Gutenberg to LIT and other ebook formats.

Intriguing, that... I do actually keep a fairly extensive library of texts in Word format (mostly from Project Gutenberg, which is why I mention it) - but that's mostly for study purposes.
it's all very cool.

I can't shake the feeling that that's all it is... just "cool".
#27 by "szcx"
2000-12-27 02:09:45
nedocze@hotmail.com
I can't shake the feeling that that's all it is... just "cool".

i've got maybe a dozen books on the pocketpc now that i'm working through.  so for me at least, it's a lot more convenient than lugging around their paper equivalents.  bookmarking and highlighting is super-useful, too.  i can highlight passages, then synchronize them with my desktop pc.
#28 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:10:22
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Andy:
What about when the author reads it him/herself?

Still a no. In my opinion, there's more to any one piece of decent prose than one interpretation - and that's just aural interpretation. One can only pronounce each word one way with one human vocal tract, and there's almost always more to it than one way of looking at it. All IMO, of course; your own mileage may vary :)
#29 by "BobJustBob"
2000-12-27 02:10:57
kevinakabob@mindspring.com
Well, I'm a pretty fast reader, so books that are short enough I can finish in less than a day. The last two books I finished, <i>Revolting Youth</i> and <i>Frisco Pigeon Mambo</i> by C.D. Payne (both great, hilarious books) I finished in just a few hours. But I have books from years ago, that I started reading and just stopped at some point for no real reason. So I guess I do it too. I still plan on reading these (ahh, someday) and I did and do enjoy them, so I usually just blame my attention span.<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#30 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:13:02
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
szcx:
i can highlight passages, then synchronize them with my desktop pc.

Why would you need to? Are you talking about reference books here? If that's the case, then I see your point - reference manuals and their ilk, and to an extent encyclopaediae, are definitely good candidates for computerisation. Not literature though. No way.
#31 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 02:21:29
andy@meejahor.com
<b>TomC</b> (#28):
<quote>
Still a no. In my opinion, there's more to any one piece of decent prose than one interpretation - and that's just aural interpretation. One can only pronounce each word one way with one human vocal tract, and there's almost always more to it than one way of looking at it. All IMO, of course; your own mileage may vary :)
</quote>
Interesting. :-)

So, what you're saying is, if your interpretation of a book is different from what the author intended, you'll choose your interpretation over his.

Now, I'm well aware of the idea that the reader is just as important as the writer, but this means you're putting the reader ABOVE the writer. Which, as a would-be author myself, I find a little strange. And even a little wrong. :-)
#32 by "CharlieWiederhold"
2000-12-27 02:24:26
charliew@3drealms.com
I believe I've finished every book I've ever picked up.

I sat here for 20 minutes trying to think of one I hadn't, but I can't think of any. I'm sure I may have put down one of my kid's books when I was a little, but does that count?

Charlie Wiederhold
#33 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:27:53
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Andy:
So, what you're saying is, if your interpretation of a book is different from what the author intended, you'll choose your interpretation over his.

Well, in true Arts student fashion, yes and no (yer honour) :)
I'd say that, where there are two or more interpretations of a piece of writing, none of them are any more or less important than any of the others. Where there is only one, I'd call into question the value of the particular piece of writing... :)
#34 by "Dreamspeaker"
2000-12-27 02:31:15
ashvin@babylonia.flatirons.org
I have the exact opposite problem. I avoid picking up large books when I don't have much time, because I will do nothing but read them until I'm done. Luckily, this generally doesn't take too long, but it can still be a problem if I have work that I should be doing.

As an example, I was supposed to annotate The House of Spirits. This didn't work too well. I would start reading and annotating, and then eventually just not annotate because I became so involved in the story. The end result of this was that I read the book through four seperate times in order to get some kind of sparse annotation spread through most of the book.

On the plus side, I am now more familiar with the Trueba family history than my own. I would be in any case, because I tend to remember all forms of media really well, but reading something that many times makes it just that much more memorable...

~~
Ignie Ferroque,
Ash. - "Non Facete Nobis Calcitrare Vestrvm Perinævm"
#35 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 02:34:04
andy@meejahor.com
<b>CharlieWiederhold</b> (#32):
<quote>
I sat here for 20 minutes trying to think of one I hadn't, but I can't think of any. I'm sure I may have put down one of my kid's books when I was a little, but does that count?
</quote>
Man, that made me realise something...

When I was a kid, I used to read books like The Secret Seven and The Faraway Tree. I probably read every one of the dozens of books in those series.

When I first started reading 'adult' books, I read quite a few that were based on films, such as Predator, Lethal Weapon and Batman, all of which were really good and I finished them. I also read Die Hard and Die Hard 2, but those were books that the films were based on. Again, both great books and I finished them.

It's since then that I've found I can't be bothered finishing most books. So I wonder if I've been spoiled? The books I read as a kid were really exciting adventure stories. The first adult books I read were also adventure stories. The books that I tend to give up on, even though I like them, are more about the message than the story. And I like those in a different way.

But then, Harry Potter is an adventure story and I gave up on that too. :-\
#36 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:39:10
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Andy - random thought from out of nowhere here, but do you read Terry Pratchett at all?
#37 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 02:44:27
andy@meejahor.com
<b>TomC</b> (#36):
<quote>
Andy - random thought from out of nowhere here, but do you read Terry Pratchett at all?
</quote>
No! But I keep meaning to buy something of his. I figure the best chance I've got of finishing a book nowadays is if it's funny.

Any recommendations for a first-timer? I'm not sure whether to go for his latest, or to start at the beginning? (Of the Discworld series, I mean. I take it those are his best?)
#38 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 02:52:35
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
Don't start at the beginning, unless you really want to read all of them :)
I'd say start with something like The Fifth Elephant or Reaper Man. Those are my personal favourites of his at the moment.
The best thing about the Discworld books is that they're incredibly light reading. I'm usually finished with a new one inside 24 hours, and I'm never disappointed. They've got great re-reading value too.
#39 by "szcx"
2000-12-27 02:57:35
nedocze@hotmail.com
Any recommendations for a first-timer?

Good Omens (co-authored with Neil Gaimen)
Mort
Reaper Man
#40 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 03:01:07
andy@meejahor.com
Speed-readers: When you're reading a book, are you aware of every single word, or do you just sort of see what's on the page and get an impression of what's happening?

When people talk about reading a whole book in a day, that baffles me. I don't know how you can possibly read (and understand) a book in that time.

It takes me about five minutes to read an average page. Okay, so if I sat and read at that rate for 24 hours straight, that would be 288 pages per day, but I know people who say they can read books like WoT in half a day. There's something wrong with those people!
#41 by "sentinel"
2000-12-27 03:06:10
jeroen@metallica.com
Andy: Did you finish 1984 by George Orwell? If you're interested in politics but you couldn't be bothered to finish that, then you have a short attention span. Otherwise it might be that all those books you never finished were simply not good enough (although you might have enjoyed them, finishing a book requires more than just enjoying it since it takes quite a while.)

If you haven't read 1984, then I suggest you give it a go :) I don't think I ever met anyone that picked it up and didn't finish it, and I've discussed it quite a bit over the years as it's my favourite book.
#42 by "sentinel"
2000-12-27 03:09:13
jeroen@metallica.com
Andy: The first two are great to get an idea of the series AND since they're also the first parts, also a good introduction. Incredibly funny too... "The colour of magic" and "The light fantastic" is what they're called.

"Mort" is also brilliant.
#43 by "WarrenMarshall"
2000-12-27 03:09:57
warren@epicgames.com
Andy (#10):
Warren, please don't. This site has been much better without the off-topic abuse so it would be a shame to start again. I'm sure you agree. If you've got it out of your system now then let's just leave it at that, okay? Thanks.

It was never "in" my system.  You stop, I'll stop.  I'm not the bad guy here.

Andy (#23):
Same here. I don't see them taking off, but that could be wishful thinking. For me, when I want to read something I go and sit on the bed with the cat curled up next to me. I can't imagine reading sat at a computer.


*downloads Microsoft Reader*

Hey, this is pretty cool!  I was agreeing with you originally, but I might have to change my opinion ... I'll grab a few books and see how this goes ...

---

Warren Marshall
Level Designer/Programmer/Corporate Shill
Epic Games (www.epicgames.com)<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#44 by "WarrenMarshall"
2000-12-27 03:11:27
warren@epicgames.com
Andy (#40):
It takes me about five minutes to read an average page. Okay, so if I sat and read at that rate for 24 hours straight, that would be 288 pages per day, but I know people who say they can read books like WoT in half a day. There's something wrong with those people!

Alan Willard at Epic is like that ... he speed reads.  He says he understands everything he reads, and he's one of those who can read new WoT novels in under 3 hours ...  I dunno.  I'm still suspicious.  :)

---

Warren Marshall
Level Designer/Programmer/Corporate Shill
Epic Games (www.epicgames.com)<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#45 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 03:19:12
andy@meejahor.com
<b>WarrenMarshall</b> (#43):
<quote>
It was never "in" my system. You stop, I'll stop. I'm not the bad guy here.
</quote>
Oh come on, you started on me in the other thread for *no* reason. :-)
<quote>
Alan Willard at Epic is like that ... he speed reads. He says he understands everything he reads, and he's one of those who can read new WoT novels in under 3 hours ... I dunno. I'm still suspicious. :)
</quote>
Right, 3 hours for, let's say, 700 pages, that's 15 seconds per page, which is about 1 second for every two lines. Now that doesn't sound quite as fast as I'd have imagined before I worked it out, but still... to read at that speed, constantly, in one session? I find it very difficult to believe that he understands everything. I wonder if he really skims all the filler and spends more time on the dialogue.

And how the hell does someone *enjoy* a book when they're reading it like that? When I read Hannibal, which was pretty much all I did for a whole week, I stepped into Harris's world and lived there for a while. I can't believe speed-readers can get that immersed in a book.
#46 by "TomC"
2000-12-27 03:23:03
tc10@st-andrews.ac.uk
I think you're failing to make the distinction between speed-reading and just reading quickly. Speed-reading is a skill that can be learnt, and generally means skimming the content. JFK, I believe, was reputed to be able to read foot-high piles of documents in one morning by doing that.
Reading quickly, on the other hand, is just that - reading, but more quickly than you :)
#47 by "SteveBauman"
2000-12-27 03:33:20
steve@manic-pop-thrills.com
When people talk about reading a whole book in a day, that baffles me. I don't know how you can possibly read (and understand) a book in that time.

Well, depends on the book. I read a complete book the other day, but it more of a novella at 130 pages, each with about 250-300 words.

Maybe it's the type of book you read. I find it difficult to read overly complex prose. I prefer interesting ideas, stories and characters presented rather simply and without much ornamentation. Hemingway was sorta known for this, but short stories by Raymond Carver are also a superb example of the form. And I love Nick Hornby (everyone here should read High Fidelity and replace records with computer games).

By the way, anyone interested in reading a brilliant and too-clever for its own good novel should check out "A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius," which is. If at first glance you think it's smug and too self-referential (typical 20-something crap), keep reading. Suddenly it gets pretty damn touching, and it's always funny. How can you not like a book that has a "Rules and Suggestions for Enjoyment of this Book," which recommends you skip pages 290-301 because they "concern the lives of people in their early twenties, and those lives are very difficult to make interesting, even when they seemed interesting to those living them at the time." He also says if you'd prefer to think of the book as a work of fiction, the author (Dave Eggers) will gladly send you the whole book on 3.5 floppy with all of the names changed. He also explains all of the book's imagery and details how much he was paid to write it (around $39,000 after taxes and such). Oh, and he just sold the thing to Hollywood for a few million bucks...
#48 by "WarrenMarshall"
2000-12-27 03:37:11
warren@epicgames.com
TomC (#46):
I think you're failing to make the distinction between <I>speed-reading</I> and just reading quickly. Speed-reading is a skill that can be learnt, and generally means skimming the content. JFK, I believe, was reputed to be able to read foot-high piles of documents in one morning by doing that.
Reading quickly, on the other hand, is just that - reading, but more quickly than you :)

Yeah, Alan doesn't "speed read" ... he says he's just a fast reader.  It's a natural thing.  He's not doing it to show off or anything.  :)

But I do wonder how much he can get into the story if he's going that fast ... but maybe it's not a problem ...

---

Warren Marshall
Level Designer/Programmer/Corporate Shill
Epic Games (www.epicgames.com)<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#49 by "WarrenMarshall"
2000-12-27 03:38:18
warren@epicgames.com
Andy (#45):
Oh come on, you started on me in the other thread for *no* reason. :-)

And you took the "Free Speech" jab for *no* reason.  :)

---

Warren Marshall
Level Designer/Programmer/Corporate Shill
Epic Games (www.epicgames.com)<i><b></b></i><i></i><i></i>
#50 by "Andy"
2000-12-27 03:46:53
andy@meejahor.com
Okay, when I talk about speed-reading, I mean reading fast. I didn't realise there was a recognised difference.


<b>WarrenMarshall</b> (#49):
<quote>
And you took the "Free Speech" jab for *no* reason. :)
</quote>
But it wasn't personal. It wasn't directed at any one person.

Without wanting to get into "right and wrong", I'll say that if I'd disagreed with the freedom of speech point, I'd have explained why I thought it was invalid and tried to present a better argument. But you didn't explain anything, you just said something rude, directed at me, and left it at that. Which you're entitled to do, but I don't know why you want to. It suggests you don't really have any counter-point and just wanted to be rude for the sake of it.
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