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T O P I C
RIP Steve Jobs
October 6th 2011, 04:21 CEST by CheesyPoof

I was late to the Apple wagon, but I'm glad that I jumped on. Thanks Steve.
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#1 by Gabe
2011-10-06 04:22:10
http://www.dartpublishing.com
I really important figure of the computer age. He'll be missed.
#2 by CheesyPoof
2011-10-06 04:24:59
Early Apple would be enough for an impressive legacy, but then you thrown in Pixar and than his second stint at Apple and it's quite an amazing resume.

<Hugin_len> Basically, cheesy doesn't have awful taste in music, he's simply very white.
#3 by Gabe
2011-10-06 04:25:11
http://www.dartpublishing.com
Well, I might be a really important figure at some point, but I meant to say "A really important figure of the computer age."
#4 by Chunkstyle
2011-10-06 04:54:33
Very sad.

Game Developers: Don't forget the zombie monkeys.
#5 by jjohnsen
2011-10-06 07:30:29
http://www.johnsenclan.com
That sucks.  I hope he had things planned out for many years to come.

#6 by Gunp01nt
2011-10-06 10:04:03
supersimon33@hotmail.com
So much for 'creating Jobs', huh Obama?

She's probably had sex with like 4 different guys by now and has no idea who he is anymore, his face lost in a memory sea of dicks.
#7 by anaqer
2011-10-06 12:31:28
Well done, GP. This makes me feel officially old.

"Apple hates everyone now." - BJB
#8 by gaggle
2011-10-06 14:35:09
A shame, he was a charming visionary.

"Roses are red, violets are blue, rubbish is dumped and so are you." : : - FML
#9 by LPMiller
2011-10-06 19:03:44
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
I pretty much got into computers because of the Apple II and an awesome summer school class back in 1979 or so. The man had a huge impact on the direction of my life.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#10 by G-Man
2011-10-06 19:44:59
I think NeXT was more important than late-stage Apple stuff (at least on the computing side). Also, I'm not sure Jobs should get any credit for anything that happened with Pixar. He basically bought the company from Lucas fully primed from what I understand.
#11 by LPMiller
2011-10-06 21:01:47
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
No, he bought a company that wasn't doing anything and was being dumped, and that's a pretty important distinction. Did he direct the films? No. He made them possible.

NeXt, I don't know. Other then NeXtOS having some relationship to Mac OS, I don't know how important it was.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#12 by G-Man
2011-10-06 21:41:23
id software was a pure NeXT shop if I recall correctly. That's legacy enough.

I don't know that Jobs was important to enabling Pixar to make films. He basically bought them as a hardware company and only when that tanked did he try to make them an animation production house as a last ditch effort. Jobs was pretty much looking for an exit strategy early on. It was just dumb luck that they got a production deal with Disney and that Toy Story turned out to be so good.
#13 by anaqer
2011-10-06 22:20:32
id software was a pure NeXT shop if I recall correctly. That's legacy enough.

Yeah, I think they only switched over to Wintel post-Quake.

"Apple hates everyone now." - BJB
#14 by Shadarr
2011-10-06 23:55:09
shadarr@gmail.com http://digital-luddite.com
#12 by G-Man

I don't know that Jobs was important to enabling Pixar to make films. He basically bought them as a hardware company and only when that tanked did he try to make them an animation production house as a last ditch effort.


This is my basic problem with the Steve Jobs lovefest.  He's the boss, sure, so he deserves some credit.  But the way people talk, you'd think he built the iPhone in his garage and directed every Pixar movie.  You don't hear people talking about how Sam Palmisano created Watson.

"I hope you one day decide to smarten the fuck up so I can stand to look at your posts." - gaggle
#15 by Gunp01nt
2011-10-07 00:07:19
supersimon33@hotmail.com
That's exactly my problem with it as well. Everyone's so much into the cult of personality that they can't separate the man from the company.

She's probably had sex with like 4 different guys by now and has no idea who he is anymore, his face lost in a memory sea of dicks.
#16 by lwf
2011-10-07 01:14:04
Without Jobs apple was an irrelevant piece of shit. He came back and now they are richer than the USA.

Handsome like a coat hanger. Wii.
#17 by LPMiller
2011-10-07 01:29:25
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
#12 by G-Man

id software was a pure NeXT shop if I recall correctly. That's legacy enough.

I don't know that Jobs was important to enabling Pixar to make films. He basically bought them as a hardware company and only when that tanked did he try to make them an animation production house as a last ditch effort. Jobs was pretty much looking for an exit strategy early on. It was just dumb luck that they got a production deal with Disney and that Toy Story turned out to be so good.



Yes and no.

It was not dumb luck, they got a relationship with Disney early on.  It was however, Disney agree to distribute the first Toy Story they made Steve decide to keep the company.

But so what? You make it sound like "oops, we made a successful movie."

And you are oddly downplaying Apples later years compared to it's early years. These are two separate Jobs. I don't think the younger Jobs would have made Apple what it is today. It wasn't exactly raking it in when he was forced out. The last 10-12 years of Apple, in my mind, is where Jobs really hit his mark.

Now granted, the idea that Apple was in it's death throws when he came back is a little wrong. Sales were bad, but the company had 12 billion in cash hidden away. So someone else could have turned them around. And some of those reasons for that success - I think porting iTunes and the iPod to windows was a big one - he resisted for a long time. But some people run a company and things just happen. Jobs didn't just run a company, he involved himself in everything, so yeah, that's why he deserves as much credit has he gets. It has nothing to do with any kind of cult of personality, it's because the man got results from a company that really had lost it's way over the years.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#18 by Shadarr
2011-10-07 02:27:23
shadarr@gmail.com http://digital-luddite.com
#16 by lwf

He came back and now they are richer than the USA.

Well, I mean, if that's the standard, so am I.

"I hope you one day decide to smarten the fuck up so I can stand to look at your posts." - gaggle
#19 by G-Man
2011-10-07 02:56:03
LPMiller: You clearly don't know what you are talking about when it comes to Pixar (and probably everything else).

Relevant quotes (emphasis added):

With loads of cash left to burn, Jobs was contacted by Catmull and Alvy about taking a second look at acquiring the division. They had a meeting at his Spartan mansion in the exclusive neighborhood of Woodside, and Jobs immediately agreed to buy the division, which he spontaneously named Pixar.

Lucas had originally hoped to get upwards of $100 million for the division and associated intellectual property, but Jobs played hardball and got the price down to $10 million. Around 5% of the company would be given to Catmull and Smith, but Jobs would maintain the lion's share of the company, though he would have limited control.

The biggest issue was geography. Modesto was almost two hours away from Jobs' home outside Palo Alto, and he was unwilling to drive down unless he had to (in fact, he visited Pixar's headquarters fewer than six times before 1994). Secondly, he was in way over his head with computer graphics. He was no engineer, although he had a decent understanding of the inner workings of the Macintosh, he knew next to nothing compared to the PhDs at Pixar.

[snip]

At the end of 1986, Pixar's future appeared bleak, but it was about to improve tremendously. Lasseter had created another short film, this one meant to demonstrate the merits of the Pixar Image Computer.

[snip]

Luxo Jr was incredibly popular. Not only did it impress computer scientists, the film industry was impressed, too. The short was nominated for Best Short Animated Film at the 1986 Academy Awards.

Pixar now had clout in the film industry and would use it to its advantage.

[snip]

With an Academy Award nomination under its belt, Pixar released its second product, RenderMan. Based on the work of Loren Carpenter while Pixar was still part of Lucasfilm, RenderMan was a moderate success in the marketplace.

[snip]

Unfortunately for Jobs, that revolution didn't occur. Other companies created animation packages based on RenderMan, like PixelPutty for the Macintosh, but none were designed for consumers to use.

[snip]

Revenues from RenderMan and the Pixar Image Computer alone would not be enough to make Pixar profitable, so Pixar began producing commercials and eventually a television show. Its most popular ads were for Life Savers candy and Listerine.

Pixar was still far from profitable, especially after the company began acquiring the workstations and servers required to making a television special. Pixar was so hard up for money that animators were reduced to begging for secondhand computers from their friends at Sun and SGI.

With a questionable financial future, Pixar pushed through the end of 1989. Lasseter's third short film, Tin Toy, was released and was awarded an Oscar for Best Short Animated Film. Tin Toy centered around a group of toys in an infant's room and was much more advanced than earlier productions. James Cameron also released The Abyss, which featured a RenderMan rendered character.

[snip]

Disney was doing much better in the late 80s. The Little Mermaid was incredibly popular, the biggest release for Disney to date. To top that, a portion of the film was produced using CAPS.

Lasseter maintained contact with Disney, and contacted Jeffrey Katzenberg, the head of Disney's film division, about creating a Christmas television special. Katzenberg was so enamored with Pixar's shorts and software that he responded by offering to produce three films.

The staff at Pixar were floored. Catmull and Smith predicted that computer generated feature films would not be feasible until the mid 90s. Pixar was almost four years ahead of the curve. Even better than that, they had a deal with Disney, the undisputed king of animation.

Because of the changed focus of the company, there was a massive reorganization. All of the sales offices around the nation were shut down, and the Pixar Image Computer was discontinued. The remaining sales staff would focus squarely on licensing Pixar's RenderMan to other software makers.

The bulk of the company's resources were devoted to the creative division headed by Lasseter. Before that, there were fewer than a dozen animators working with Lasseter; that number doubled and then tripled during the production of the first film, Toy Story.

The bigger staff and investments in equipment made it necessary for Toy Story to succeed if Pixar expected to survive. The company had lost $60 million of Jobs' money at a time when Jobs was at an emotional low. NeXT was dying, with its loyal customers jumping ship to Windows NT and Sun workstations.

It seemed that if Pixar was unable to turn a profit soon, Jobs would sell it to a company like Microsoft (Alvy had become a fellow at Microsoft after leaving Pixar).


Steve Jobs flew to Anaheim to join Smith and Catmull during negotiations with Katzenberg to finalize the three film deal. Jobs had gotten into a heated argument with Katzenberg during a sales call months before, when he was trying to sell Disney a lab of his NeXTstations for the animators, so Catmull and Smith were nervous how the two would get along.

[snip]

The employees at Pixar were optimistic about the future as Lasseter began writing the screenplay for Toy Story, but that would soon change. Jobs had never gotten along with Smith, and the relationship grew even worse during the negotiations with Disney. Smith was terrified that Katzenberg would walk out on the abrasive Jobs.

After Jobs snapped at Smith and yelled at him during a meeting at the Deer Park NeXT headquarters, Smith resigned from Pixar and started a brand new company
, Altimira, which produced computer animation software. Altimira was eventually bought by Microsoft, and its technology was used in Microsoft's line of multimedia CD-ROMs.

Work on Toy Story was slow. Lasseter had no experience in writing screenplays for feature films and was struggling to create endearing characters. The story centered around a toy cowboy, Woody, and his conflict with a new space doll, Lunar Larry. Lasseter eventually put together a 30 second trailer to show off the characters and the animation technique.

When Lasseter showed it to Disney executives, they were stunned. The footage was unlike anything they had produced. Even the critics in Disney's animation division, the ones who had the most to lose if Pixar succeeded, were enamored with the technique, if not the story line. Disney approved the script, and real production began on January 19, 1993.

[snip]

Toy Story's voice talent was phenomenal. The untested firm had no trouble signing Tom Hanks and Tim Allen for little more than union voice actors after they were shown the short trailer. For the soundtrack, Lasseter personally courted the popular Randy Newman to write and perform the songs.

Everything seemed to be going well. Even Jobs, the absentee owner who continued to devote his attention to the flagging NeXT, took an interest in the film's progress. He wanted to be kept abreast of Toy Story's production, so Lasseter and producer Ralph Guggenheim made a biweekly trip to NeXT's headquarters (which had recently moved from the lavish Deer Park offices to lower cost space nearby) where they would show him clips and pretend to accept his advice.

[snip]

Jobs still wasn't terribly interested in what was happening at Pixar, but as November 22 neared, he perked up. At a Disney gala in New York, hosted by Rudy Giuliani, Jobs was witness to the dramatic reactions to Pixar's stunning work. He soaked up praise as the night wore on.

Several weeks later, Jobs took the title of president from Catmull. Catmull had never been interested in being president, and it signaled Jobs emergence at Pixar.

[snip]

Pixar became a household name and had proved that computer generated films weren't just possible, but profitable.

One week after opening day, Pixar went public with a stock price set at $22. The price soared to $50 on the first day of trading, turning Jobs into a billionaire. Pixar went on to renegotiate its contract with Disney and released six blockbuster films that made well over $1 billion.

In 2004, Pixar declined to renew its contract with Disney and appears to be poised to distribute its films on its own. On January 24, 2006, Disney announced that it was acquiring Pixar for roughly $7.4 billion in Disney stock. This made Jobs Disney's largest shareholder and turned Pixar into a wholly owned subsidiary of Disney.

Source.

Jobs had absolutely nothing to do with developing the animation department at Pixar (except for begrudgingly paying their salaries so they could continue to churn out tech demos to help sell the workstations Pixar was producing at the time). Lasseter basically deserves all the credit. He made all the shorts at Pixar, he had the contacts with Disney which enabled the film deal, he wrote the script for Toy Story and guided the vision for the film (which obviously set the tone for all the future films), and he even helped get some of the talent onboard. At all times Jobs was basically an obstacle or potential spoiler for Lasseter - a hindrance, not a help. Pixar succeeded mostly because Jobs didn't want to have anything to do with the company.
#20 by LPMiller
2011-10-07 05:29:26
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
Not to take anything away from Lassiter, who I also think is a great man...well, he disagrees with you.

source

But hey, go head and quote an entire article at me by the famous Tom Hormby.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#21 by LPMiller
2011-10-07 05:43:17
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
[quote="He never failed again, for he stayed true to his faith in computer animation believing, as he says, that "this was what Walt Disney was waiting for" and started making short films for the director George Lucas, until Steve Jobs, freshly fired from his dream job, bought the entire animation unit from Lucas for $10 million and called it Pixar. Jobs was buying the technology, of course, but he was also buying something or someone else. He was buying John Lasseter. At the time, Lasseter was still in his twenties and had never made a full-length feature. But Jobs looked to him to create not only a new kind of movie but also a new kind of company. "The only thing Steve Jobs has ever asked me," Lasseter says, "in all the years we've been together and have been partners, the only thing he has ever asked me is: Make it great."


source

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#22 by LPMiller
2011-10-07 05:47:45
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
The point being, whatever his intentions were when he bought the company, Toy Story got made. Do you honestly think Steve Jobs would have done that, or stuck it out, if he thought it was a loser?  A guy as nitpicky as he was? Really? I mean, you are awesome at posting links and coaching it to make you sound like the smartest kid in the room, but that's an entirely retarded concept.  And the people actually there at the time disagree with you.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#23 by bago
2011-10-07 10:23:02
manga_Rando@hotmail.com
What in the hell is happening to you people? 3 typos in 24 posts!!! I want meticulously spelled multi-screen rants!  Or not.

REMEMbER DESCENT THE HIGHEST FORM of PATRIOTiC
#24 by deadlock
2011-10-07 12:32:25
http://www.deadlocked.org/
g-man:
I think NeXT was more important than late-stage Apple stuff (at least on the computing side). Also, I'm not sure Jobs should get any credit for anything that happened with Pixar. He basically bought the company from Lucas fully primed from what I understand.

NeXT is only important in the context of the revived Apple since OS X essentially is NeXTSTEP.

Shadarr:
#12 by G-Man

I don't know that Jobs was important to enabling Pixar to make films. He basically bought them as a hardware company and only when that tanked did he try to make them an animation production house as a last ditch effort.


This is my basic problem with the Steve Jobs lovefest.  He's the boss, sure, so he deserves some credit.  But the way people talk, you'd think he built the iPhone in his garage and directed every Pixar movie.  You don't hear people talking about how Sam Palmisano created Watson.

There's some truth in this and people are quick to eulogise when someone has died. That said, I think you're selling Jobs short. He may not have come up with every idea and it's certainly a team effort but he was passionate about and championed all of these great products and innovations and there's no doubt that they wouldn't have been successful if he hadn't been as enthusiastic as he was. And he was right there, in the thick of it, testing, refining, contributing. He wasn't like the revolving door CEOs at HP or maybe Steve Ballmer at Microsoft: only seeing the products during monthly reviews or whatever. Jobs was right there from inception to launch, contributing at every stage.

#25 by Fugazi(werking)
2011-10-07 19:23:40
A shame he died. I liked his tenacity a great deal, but his acolytes tire me.

#26 by BobJustBob
2011-10-07 20:12:01
Yeah, it sucks how people are always talking about how their superior product is so superior.

BUYBUYBUY
#27 by Fugazi(werking)
2011-10-07 21:51:52
Yes.
That's exactly what I meant since I am irrational and unreasonable about my tastes.

#28 by G-Man
2011-10-07 22:13:57
LPMiller: I know that I'm beating a dead horse here, but let me break it down into smaller chunks for you:

Jobs visited Pixar in person less than six times before 1994 according to Hormby, mostly because he couldn't be bothered to do the less than two hour drive from Palo Alto to Modesto.

The Disney film development deal was reached in 1992 and the Toy Story script was formally approved by Disney on January 19, 1993. A rough cut of the film was presented to Disney on November 19, 1993. Disney didn't like it and required major changes to the script which were made over the course of two weeks. In March of 1994 the cast returns to record the revised script.

That means that the script was frozen and all voicework was recorded before Jobs had been to Pixar more than a half-dozen times in his life. Toy Story then premiered on November 19, 1995.

Exactly how much involvement could Jobs have had on Toy Story's development if he was never at Pixar when pretty much everything but the grunt work of rendering it was completed?
#29 by deadlock
2011-10-08 01:27:17
http://www.deadlocked.org/
Real shame pixar never got to to anything after Toy Story, isn't it?

#30 by deadlock
2011-10-08 01:28:46
http://www.deadlocked.org/
Come on lads, the dead can't begrudge themselves.

#31 by LPMiller
2011-10-08 01:32:54
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
Yeah, and yet you are still wrong.

For one thing, you have your story on Toy Story wrong. According special features that are right on the Toy Story dvd (and in articles on the web) Disney required rewrites before the movie was made. Lasseter previewed the rough cut to them and everyone hated it. Lasseter went back, and in two weeks re did it to his own vision, which basically ignored every note Disney gave him, and that became the movie that was released.  What you have written contradicts Lasseters version. You can make the chunks as small as you like, it's not going to suddenly make them true.

Some of this is outlaid in this otherwise kind of boring Charlie Rose interview: source, but the gist is also restated on the latest Blu-Ray.

"Steve's major impact was on the strategic direction of the company," said David Price, author of "The Pixar Touch." "He had the crucial insight that Pixar could one day be the equal of the Walt Disney Company in animation. He made this vision a reality by overseeing the IPO of Pixar stock in 1985, a week after 'Toy Story' was released. He foresaw that if they had that capital, it would give them the independence to create a body of work and to become a brand that would become as powerful in entertainment as Disney. He was very explicit about this.""]"Steve's major impact was on the strategic direction of the company," said David Price, author of "The Pixar Touch." "He had the crucial insight that Pixar could one day be the equal of the Walt Disney Company in animation. He made this vision a reality by overseeing the IPO of Pixar stock in 1985, a week after 'Toy Story' was released. He foresaw that if they had that capital, it would give them the independence to create a body of work and to become a brand that would become as powerful in entertainment as Disney. He was very explicit about this."


source, and yes I know they got the date wrong

So really, we have yet another source that shows Job's involvement was a bit more then 6 visits to the company.

The horse isn't dead, you keep missing him.

Was Lasseter the creative force in the company? Yes, Steve himself said that. That doesn't mean Jobs was kicking it up old school, forgetting he even owned the company.  I mean, you are telling the story of 2 different Steves, stating he had no real involvement because it wasn't selling what he originally wanted to sell. That doesn't wash with his entire history, for one thing.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#32 by lwf
2011-10-08 01:42:19
Look. It is true that but for Jobs' investment and subsequent support, Pixar doesn't exist. But that's a incredibly low bar to meet. The same could probably be said of coffee. Michaelango couldn't have done the chapel without patronage either, but it's pretty clear who deserves the credit on that one.

Handsome like a coat hanger. Wii.
#33 by LPMiller
2011-10-08 03:07:21
lpmiller@gotapex.com http://www.gotapex.com
i never said he deserved all the credit, just a bit more then G-man's simplistic view.

"Testiculos habet et bene pendentes" - "He has testicles, and they dangle nicely."

"LP, your big balls are a religion." - Jibble
#34 by deadlock
2011-10-10 13:00:23
http://www.deadlocked.org/
For G-man.

#35 by G-Man
2011-10-10 18:44:13
Seen it dummy. Ever heard of PR?
#36 by Hugin
2011-10-10 19:12:11
lmccain@nber.org
I think the lives of Henry Ford and Thomas Edison aren't as cut and dried as general history would lead people to think (Edison in particular merely refined/commercialized a lot of things he's given credit for inventing, and when I say Edison, in a lot of cases I mean his staff/assistants anyway).

But what Ford, Jobs, Edison and others like them had was this combination, this intersection of charisma, perfectionism, motivational skill, marketing skill, stubbornness, and (enough) actual technical knowledge to make sure their companies weren't making bullshit.  

When you look at Reed Hastings at Netflix, or any of the assholes running HP, or Larry Ellison, or any number of others you could name in the business community, the combination of all that is special and truly rare and underselling it is foolish.  Yes, it's probably smart to note all the other people that contributed to the successful events in Steve Jobs life, and yes, some of these things would have to have been essentially fortuitous accidents, but the key is, Jobs, with very few exceptions, managed to take positive advantage of those events.  And it's clear from talking to everyone who worked with him or had to compete against him, from friends and plain old enemies, what he did, what he was, was unique, and not to be lightly dismissed.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#37 by G-Man
2011-10-10 19:37:11
I know about Edison and agree with your first paragraph.

I also agree that if H-P's management is your benchmark for comparison purposes, then sure, Jobs is amazing. But I don't think that is a fair (or useful) comparison. Also, what's wrong with Larry Ellison besides being an asshole? His company is very successful too.
#38 by Hugin
2011-10-10 20:21:17
lmccain@nber.org
I was trying to make a range, between total fuckups, what seem to be decent enough CEOs who've made some missteps, and successful CEOs  who probably aren't going to be lauded as "world changers" when they die.  I should have put the HP guys and gals before Hastings.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#39 by gaggle
2011-10-10 21:20:05
Clicking 'like' on hugin's posts

"Roses are red, violets are blue, rubbish is dumped and so are you." : : - FML
#40 by BobJustBob
2011-10-10 21:21:52
I can't wait for it to stop being trendy to bash Netflix.

BUYBUYBUY
#41 by CheesyPoof
2011-10-10 21:25:46
Well, if Netflix stopped fucking up they wouldn't be bashed.

<Hugin_len> Basically, cheesy doesn't have awful taste in music, he's simply very white.
#42 by BobJustBob
2011-10-10 21:28:49
If I had read your comment two minutes ago I would have said they haven't fucked up yet, but then I read they're keeping discs on netflix.com. Fucking Netflix.

BUYBUYBUY
#43 by deadlock
2011-10-11 01:03:04
http://www.deadlocked.org/
#35 by G-Man

Seen it dummy. Ever heard of PR?

There's something sort of... nice about you calling me a 'dummy'. Like we're brothers. *SNIFF*

#44 by TreeFrog
2011-10-11 01:12:42
Jobs was a total dick, but at least he made people care about UI. Imagine being stuck with Windows Phone 6 for all time. And that's exactly what would have happened if Apple hadn't forced everyone else to raise their game.

I am back from two weeks in Alabama. The weather was gorgeous and I bought a bunch of tools and clothes, thereby balancing out my manliness and femininity.

"One part disembowels me while another slowly eats its way through the gas line. As I bleed out on the floor, it reminds me that I need to buy milk." - Jibble
#45 by BobJustBob
2011-10-11 02:40:20
I find your story implausible. Alabama has never had two straight weeks of good weather.

BUYBUYBUY
#46 by TreeFrog
2011-10-12 01:45:18
I was exaggerating. I was there for just under two weeks.

"One part disembowels me while another slowly eats its way through the gas line. As I bleed out on the floor, it reminds me that I need to buy milk." - Jibble
#47 by Trolly McTroll
2011-10-18 22:38:05
I'm glad he commissioned someone to write his biography so his children could know him.  That's nice.

#48 by Gunp01nt
2011-10-18 23:02:30
supersimon33@hotmail.com
In a way, aren't we all his children?

She's probably had sex with like 4 different guys by now and has no idea who he is anymore, his face lost in a memory sea of dicks.
#49 by jjohnsen
2011-10-25 04:17:10
http://www.johnsenclan.com
Did anyone get the biography?   It's not bad so far, I'm actually a little shocked that Jobs agreed to it, he comes of as a bit of a dick.  The honesty is not what I expected from a guy that usually controlled the media so well.

#50 by yotsuya
2011-10-25 04:55:13
Well, he's not around to say anything about it, so either he didn't care, or the publisher didn't care. Hmmm.

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