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T O P I C
5 Years of Movies In Your Life
July 22nd 2008, 16:30 CEST by Hugin

Just a little exercise. Pick movies from five years in your life, and categorize them.

Start with the year you were born. End with '07, since '08 isn't finished yet. Take three years in between, roughly evenly spaced (I mean, you could get precise about it or you could just pick three arbitrary years, so long as you get decent spacing between them).

For those five years, go here, scroll down the links on the left side and check the release list for that year. Then pick three movies.

1. The one you think (of the movies listed at least), is historically or academically or culturally the most important or valuable, or aflat quality judgment.

2. Your personal favorite, most fun, guilty pleasure, etc, regardless of importance or quality

3. One you didn't know existed and find interesting, or keep meaning to see but haven't yet, etc.
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#1 by Gabe
2008-07-22 16:30:55
http://www.dartpublishing.com
lwf wanted it done, and as we all know, he gets what he wants.

Wait, that's completely not how it works for him...oh well.
#2 by G-Man
2008-07-22 17:18:54
This is a terrible exercise, since the site you linked to lists only the top grossing movies for each year. Since the people who post here are all roughly the same age, that means we would all be picking three films from the following list:

1974 Blazing Saddles
1975 Jaws
1976 Rocky
1977 Star Wars Ep. IV: A New Hope
1978 Grease
1979 Kramer vs. Kramer
1980 Star Wars Ep. V: The Empire Strikes Back
1981 Raiders of the Lost Ark
1982 ET: The Extra-Terrestrial
1983 Star Wars Ep. VI: Return of the Jedi
1984 Ghost Busters
1985 Back to the Future
1986 Top Gun
1987 3 Men and a Baby
1988 Rain Man
1989 Batman
1990 Home Alone
1991 Terminator 2: Judgmment Day
1992 Aladdin
1993 Jurassic Park
1994 Forrest Gump
1995 Toy Story
1996 Independence Day
1997 Titanic
1998 Saving Private Ryan
1999 Star Wars Ep. I: The Phantom Menace
2000 How the Grinch Stole Christmas
2001 Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
2002 Spider-Man
2003 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
2004 Shrek 2
2005 Star Wars Ep. III: Revenge of the Sith
2006 Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest
2007 Spider-Man 3

I'm reasonably confident that everyone (barring yotsuya) has seen virtually all of the movies on this list. Many of them aren't even especially good films, but are just popular genre pictures. If you add in the weirdo year spacing rule, pretty much everyone will be talking about the same three films. Don't get me wrong, I'm not against populist films per se - hell I've seen 67 of the 87 movies on the full list and all of the movies on the above list - but it would be much more interesting if you didn't have to pick the highest grossing film for each year.
#3 by Hugin
2008-07-22 17:19:58
lmccain@nber.org
1973:

1. Mean Streets. The first Scorsese/De Niro crime movie.

2. Enter the Dragon. Bruce Lee, Jim Kelly, Bolo Yeung, Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung. Basically Lee's last film (setting aside posthumous work using doubles and creative editing).

3. Papillon. Never seen it, always meant to. Is it odd that in a movie with Dustin Hoffman and Steve McQeen I'm most interested in what Anthony Zerbe will be like?


1981: (This year is chock full of stuff)

1. Raiders of the Lost Ark. I'm not even that huge an Indiana Jones fan, but it's hard to argue against this one historically in terms of cultural stature.

2. Dragonslayer. I could put a bunch of 1981 films here (Scanners, Clash of the Titans, Excalibur), but I like the relative low fantasy grittyness of Dragonslayer.

3. The Postman Always Rings Twice. Heavy cast, could be interesting.


1990:

1. Godfather 3 I guess. Weakest of the 3 but still. Hey Sophia, try the other side of the camera, I think you'll get better results!

2. Quick Change. A wonderful, horrendously underseen movie about a heist gone wrong. Fuck, this year has Miller's Crossing too. Fuck. And Tremors!

3. After Dark My Sweet. I hear it's a great modern noir, and I really need to Netflix it soon.


1998:

1. Saving Private Ryan. An overrated but vastly popular movie that helped spark a fresh wave of WW2 nostalgia/worship and a crapload of Normandy Beach invasion sequences in video games.

2. Blade. A man with sunglasses and a techno soundtrack is invincible. Trufax. Crap, also Zero Effect...and you know, Deep Rising is a real hoot...

3. The Big Lebowski. No, I've never seen it. I know, I know.


2007:

1. Nothing super leaps out at me as a great huge important film in the mainstream culture. Juno has pop culture juice, but it could just be another Garden State or whatever a few years from now. There Will Be Blood?

2. Smokin' Aces. This movie has a ton of problems and it's derivative all around, but I still liked it. Mostly because in my head was an almost entirely different (but great) movie about an assassin and a bodyguard falling in love, starring Alicia Keys and Common, and Smokin' Aces had about 2 minutes of that movie spliced into it.

3. Persepolis. I made four separate plans to see this and weird stuff kept popping up and interfering.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#4 by Hugin
2008-07-22 17:25:24
lmccain@nber.org
G-man, I realize my instructions are somewhat unclear, but you're doing it wrong.  Check my example for the proper format.  It's three films per chosen year.

Also, the ages of people here are not quite as homogeneous as you think, and there's wiggle room on the intervening years.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#5 by G-Man
2008-07-22 17:25:39
1. The one you think (of the movies listed at least), is historically or academically or culturally the most important or valuable, or aflat quality judgment.

None of the films made between 1978 and 2007 are important to the medium from an artistic standpoint. From a cultural or historical perspective they are all pretty much junk as well. I guess Titanic was a big deal both in terms of setting new box office grossing records and really accellerating international release schedules (it was the biggest grossing international film ever made, and was a huge cultural force worldwide for some reason). Star Wars Ep. IV (and Jaws before it) was arguably more important than Titanic to the business of filmmaking but they are not in the allowed period.

2. Your personal favorite, most fun, guilty pleasure, etc, regardless of importance or quality

Ghost Busters

3. One you didn't know existed and find interesting, or keep meaning to see but haven't yet, etc.

None. Seen 'em all. I'm surprised that Grinch made so much money though.
#6 by Hugin
2008-07-22 17:29:24
lmccain@nber.org
Also, "scroll down the links on the left side and check the release list for that year".  A much longer list, not just the individual top grosser that year.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#7 by G-Man
2008-07-22 17:35:25
Those links are horribly innaccurate man. Use IMDB instead. Only 1 film released in 1935? Only 10 in 1942? Only 30 released in 1970? Are they joking?
#8 by Hugin
2008-07-22 17:39:11
lmccain@nber.org
The IMDB list is horribly cluttered and too long for what is supposed to be a casual exercise.  Engage with the premise as it has been explained to you, or go pick your nose or something.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#9 by Gabe
2008-07-22 17:54:12
http://www.dartpublishing.com
We're all roughly the same age? How rough is this scale?
#10 by Jibble
2008-07-22 17:54:26
Holy legwork, Batman!

1984

Man, there's some oldies in here. Ghost Busters, Gremlins, Temple of Doom, The Last Starfighter, Top Secret!, Buckaroo Banzai...it's like a cornucopia of 80's madness.

1. From a film art perspective, I'd have to go with Paris, Texas.
2. No contest. This is Spinal Tap.
3. Amadeus. Never seen it, but feel like I should.

1989

Even more. Bill & Ted, Gleaming the Cube, UHF, Young Einstein, Who's Harry Crumb? Ahhh, good times.

1. Do the Right Thing. Yes, I know this will start an argument. Shut up.
2. I don't know if it's considered a guilty pleasure, but I still enjoy Uncle Buck.
3. My Left Foot. Yet another that I've never seen but feel like I should. Yes, many of these will be Oscar winners/contenders.

1994

Oof, so much for the golden years of camp. Ace Ventura, Chasers, The Crow, City Slickers (2), Blown Away, The Shadow, Blankman, Stargate, The Professional...

1. The Paper loses only because of The Shawshank Redemption. Tough break.
2. PCU, always a classic.
3. Ed Wood. The concept seemed intriguing to me but I never got around to seeing it.

1999

It's really depressing seeing the quality decline over the years. 1999 did have The Iron Giant and Fight Club and October Sky, though, which gives it a little boost.

1. The Matrix. Not a great movie, but you can't deny the effect it's had on the industry.
2. Office Space.
3. Boys Don't Cry. Never seen it, always sort of meant to.

2004

Ahh, starting to get closer to the now. Who can argue that this is the best year? It's the year Torque and You Got Served came out, after all.

1. The Passion of the Christ. Historically important, for obvious reasons.
2. Anchorman, guilty pleasure.
3. Red Trousers - The Life of the Hong Kong Stuntmen. Never heard of it, but sounds exceedingly interesting to me.

That's a rough exercise. It's hard to pick a favorite versus a guilty pleasure and weigh various ones against each other.

Lady, people aren't chocolates. But you know what they are, mostly? Bastards. Bastard-coated bastards with bastard filling.

Blog. 190 lbs.  10 to go.
#11 by Dethstryk
2008-07-22 17:58:15
jemartin@tcainternet.com
Demolition Man is the best cinematic experience of the past 300 years.

\"Making love to a woman is like working on an assembly line. No matter how good you are at it, you\'ll eventually be replaced by a foreigner or a machine.\"
#12 by bishop
2008-07-22 18:02:30
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
Forget rocky 6 and rambo 5, DEMOLITION MAN 2!
#13 by BobJustBob
2008-07-22 18:04:00
I'm surprised that Grinch made so much money though.


That is exactly what I was just thinking. What a piece of garbage.

"The best experiences are generative experiences. The best stories are player stories." - Will Wright
#14 by yotsuya
2008-07-22 18:04:01
Jibsey-

See Amadeus. It's great. I only saw it last year myself, but I loved it so much I went out and bought it.
#15 by yotsuya
2008-07-22 18:04:30
Oh, and see Ed Wood, too.
#16 by BobJustBob
2008-07-22 18:05:41
Also, this topic is proof that Hugin has officially become a Qt3er. They love their lists and they love their ridiculously convoluted forum games.

Also he posted it over there first.

"The best experiences are generative experiences. The best stories are player stories." - Will Wright
#17 by Jamie
2008-07-22 18:08:29
jamie@jmadigan.net http://www.jmadigan.net
Oh noes!

blog | photoblog | PlanetCrap Flickr group

"It was a little hard to tell how bad I was bleeding on account of the salsa" -- Jibble
#18 by lwf
2008-07-22 18:08:29
Stfu Yotsuya.

When you look at all the observations, calculations, and analysis that has gone into astrology, religion and mysticism make astrology look like an exact science. Wii.
#19 by Jibble
2008-07-22 18:25:06
Bob two days ago: STOP BEING STUPID DICKS, YOU'RE BEING STUPID DICKS. I HATE IT WHEN YOU OBSTRUCT DISCUSSION.

Bob today: I'M A STUPID DICK AND I'M HERE TO OBSTRUCT THIS HERE DISCUSSION.

Lady, people aren't chocolates. But you know what they are, mostly? Bastards. Bastard-coated bastards with bastard filling.

Blog. 190 lbs.  10 to go.
#20 by Hugin
2008-07-22 18:27:13
lmccain@nber.org
#16 by BobJustBob

Also, this topic is proof that Hugin has officially become a Qt3er. They love their lists and they love their ridiculously convoluted forum games.

Also he posted it over there first.


I assumed people wouldn't want it here, and then lwf asked for it, so I cross posted.  Feel free to not participate if you like.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#21 by BobJustBob
2008-07-22 18:30:19
Jibble, I said no trolling. Like what you're doing now. Stop being a stupid dick.

"The best experiences are generative experiences. The best stories are player stories." - Will Wright
#22 by Ergo
2008-07-22 18:33:24
None of the films made between 1978 and 2007 are important to the medium from an artistic standpoint.

I lol'ed.

Invention is the Green Goblin of Necessary Lemonade.

--Flowers
#23 by bishop
2008-07-22 18:40:12
http://www.darkintel.org/00FF00/
Bob should just stick to Qt3.
#24 by gaggle
2008-07-22 18:49:03
I play games, but not these type of games. Idunno why exactly they turn me off so bad but it's always been this way. Ya'll have fun making lists though *shrug*

"You can produce nuclear reactions directly through ultra high electric field initiated photodisintegration."
#25 by jjohnsen
2008-07-22 19:00:09
http://www.johnsenclan.com
Obviously the best thing we can do is bash Hugin for trying to start a discussion of some kind.  His poor choice of a website is enough that we should just talk about WOW instead.

1974
This year is a freaking goldmine.  Young Frankenstein, Blazing Saddles, Chinatown, Death Wish, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Godfather II?  My hell, how can you pick just one?  I suppose culturally I'd pick Blazing Saddles for the boundaries it pushed with humor in a mainstream movie.  Chainsaw Massacre could easily be picked for the same thing it did in the horror genre, but I'm sticking with Mel Brooks.

Young Frankenstein is my favorite of that year though. I know I should pick Godfather II, but I can't count how many times I've watched Young Frankenstein, and I still laugh every time.

I've never seen The Conversation, though I know I should.

1982
Porky's probably had the most impact, didn't it start the 80's teen sex comedy thing?

Fast Times at Ridgemont High is my favorite for the year, though I love Firefox, Poltergeist and The Dark Crystal

Gandhi is the one I've never seen but know I should

1991
Silence of the lambs gave us Hannibal Lector

My favorite for the year was Terminator 2.  I hadn't even seen the first one, but I think I saw this one three times in the theater.  My uncle took me once, then I convinced my dad to go and finally me and two friends bought tickets to something else and then snuck in.  I still watch it for a while when it's on cable.

I've never seen the Cape Fear remake all the way through.

1999
Important movie was probably Matrix, just for the special effects and how it became so huge.

My favorite movie for that year was Office Space

Special mention to Eyes Wide Shut for being total ass that forces Kubrick lovers to come up with horseshit to defend it.

2007
Bourne Ultimatum or Ratatoille was my favorite for 2007, though I recognize how good No Country for Old Men was.

#26 by jjohnsen
2008-07-22 19:01:40
http://www.johnsenclan.com
I thought it was interesting to see  just how many films are released now.  In 1974 there were weekends not a single movie was released, and most just had one or two.  Now there are more released in a weekend sometimes than there were in a month (counting indie films).  It's crazy.

#27 by BobJustBob
2008-07-22 19:04:26
THERE IS STILL A U IN RATATOUILLE

"The best experiences are generative experiences. The best stories are player stories." - Will Wright
#28 by Jamie
2008-07-22 19:17:30
jamie@jmadigan.net http://www.jmadigan.net
Leopard vs. Crocodile --FIGHT!

blog | photoblog | PlanetCrap Flickr group

"It was a little hard to tell how bad I was bleeding on account of the salsa" -- Jibble
#29 by Jibble
2008-07-22 19:17:55
SEEN IT, MOTHERFUCKER.

Lady, people aren't chocolates. But you know what they are, mostly? Bastards. Bastard-coated bastards with bastard filling.

Blog. 190 lbs.  10 to go.
#30 by Ashiran
2008-07-22 19:36:44
I actually saw it as well. Maybe I'm more in tune with the web then I thought. Seeing as how I'm roughly in the same age group as all you ancient behemoths.







If you are wondering if that was a hidden way to call you fat. IT WAS!

Any game where competence can be measured by the amount of clicks per minute is not a strategy game.
#31 by gaggle
2008-07-22 19:43:25
True jj, the discussion is good. Eh maybe I should try it. So, okay I start from my birthyear, and.. I've seen all movies on that list so I can't mention any movies I didn't know existed.

1980   Star Wars Ep. V: The Empire Strikes Back
Obviously culturally important, but I don't know what else to say.. I'll want to watch it some day again, but I can wait another twenty years.


1991   Terminator 2: Judgment Day
Ties with Aliens for Best action movie ever. More than anything this, Aliens and The Abyss defines my childhood. I was never hot for T1 though. It's required watching for T2 obviously, but T1 to me was just a decent B-movie on its own.


1998   Saving Private Ryan
I wouldn't watch it if it came on TV today, but it was an exciting and important movie for its serious take on history. On a more personal level it's important to me for introducing the power of handheld action and the bleached bypass postprocess. But come to think of it Independence Day from two years before would actually be my guilty pleasure, I love that movie and its unbridled and over-the-top-rofllol take on patriotism.


And then everything up to Iron Man in '08 is forgettable material. Sure Harry Potter was an important British franchise, but arguably the books are the real treasures in that product. The Lord of the Rings are important for catapulting New Zealand to the world stage, and it anchored Wesa as a powerhouse of special effects.. but meh, the trilogy didn't do much for me. And fuck Spider-Man 3, that movie still makes me angry.

I did really like Iron Man but it's hardly important in any real way. Maybe for representing the beginning of Marvel's collective universe, time will tell on that one, but as a film it's about as important as Hancock.


Sorry, guess I couldn't keep with the rules. Maybe that's why I don't like these games, the rules are inhibiting when we could just talk about movies :)

"You can produce nuclear reactions directly through ultra high electric field initiated photodisintegration."
#32 by gaggle
2008-07-22 19:44:44
Oh I guess I could've thrown in Ghostbusters, what a terrific movie. I'd watch 1 and 2 today given the chance.

"You can produce nuclear reactions directly through ultra high electric field initiated photodisintegration."
#33 by yotsuya
2008-07-22 19:48:42
Yeah, I tried to play within the rules as well, but the first rule is giving me the most issues. I picked 1987, for example, and the 'best' movie there is RoboCop, but to be honest, I don't think it has the same resonance for today's young adult movie goer as it would for someone in their mid-30s.
#34 by Hugin
2008-07-22 19:53:08
lmccain@nber.org
#31 by gaggle

 So, okay I start from my birthyear, and.. I've seen all movies on that list so I can't mention any movies I didn't know existed.


That seems pretty unlikely.  You've really seen every movie on this list?


Sorry, guess I couldn't keep with the rules. Maybe that's why I don't like these games, the rules are inhibiting when we could just talk about movies :)

I think you're mostly misunderstanding the rules (which I admit could have been written more clearly).  Look at my post for the format.

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#35 by Matt Perkins
2008-07-22 19:56:43
wizardque@yahoo.com http://whatwouldmattdo.com/
Jamie (#28):
Leopard vs. Crocodile --FIGHT!

I hadn't seen that... That must have been one hungry fucking leopard. Also, one incredibly surprised croc.

"the concept that a happy worker is a productive worker is hardly an entry from Matt's Big Book Of Things The Fairies Said." - Dum
#36 by gaggle
2008-07-22 19:57:33
Yeah, well, I'd actually want to mention most of the movies pre-1990ties in some capacity. RoboCop (wtf capital C? I had to look that up but, yup, capital C) is right up there alongside (but slightly lower) Aliens and T2. In the same echelon as, hm, Total Recall?, Ghostbusters, Predator, and no doubt many more. Incredible movies all of them, and for my tastes far better than most of what comes out these da-oh my God I'm getting old!

"You can produce nuclear reactions directly through ultra high electric field initiated photodisintegration."
#37 by Hugin
2008-07-22 19:58:58
lmccain@nber.org
#33 by yotsuya
2008-07-22 19:48:42
Yeah, I tried to play within the rules as well, but the first rule is giving me the most issues. I picked 1987, for example, and the 'best' movie there is RoboCop, but to be honest, I don't think it has the same resonance for today's young adult movie goer as it would for someone in their mid-30s.


Over Full Metal Jacket?  Princess Bride? Lethal Weapon (which spawned a ton of knockoffs), etc.  Fatal Attraction, which had a huge amount of pop cultural buzz for years, even still some today?

"Bioshock, sadly, is no Painkiller." - BobJustBob
#38 by gaggle
2008-07-22 20:01:17
#34 by Hugin
That seems pretty unlikely.  You've really seen every movie on this list?

Oh, no, only the list linked in the thread description. Heh I can safely say I've never heard of In Search of Historic Jesus :)

I probably did misunderstand the rules, I did kind of glace of them. I'm sorry, I promise I'm not always like that hehe. Next time write a little .php script and some html input fields m'kay, that'll be real good mhmm.

"You can produce nuclear reactions directly through ultra high electric field initiated photodisintegration."
#39 by Ergo
2008-07-22 20:26:01
I'll give it a crack:

1966:

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf was a great adaptation of Albee's stage play. It also featured some amazing talent at their best.

It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown is iconic for American kids.

A Man for All Seasons is something I've been meaning to watch and never have.

1972:

The Godfather. One of the best American films ever made and in my personal top 10.

Deliverance. I saw this on broadcast TV many years after it was released and it scared the crap out of me.

Last Tango in Paris. Pushed the boundaries of sexuality in mainstream film. Still haven't seen it.

1977:

Star Wars. As an 11-year-old kid, this was "the greatest thing I have ever seen."

Eraserhead. David Lynch's debut.

Annie Hall. Best Picture winner for 1977 and considered one of Woody Allen's best films. Haven't seen it.

1997:

L.A. Confidential. Loved this movie. I'm a sucker for noir films and this is one I can watch over and over again.

Chasing Amy. You either love Kevin Smith movies or hate them. This is my favorite.

Mrs. Brown. Judi Dench was nominated for this one and I still haven't watched it.

2007:

Eastern Promises. No one can do stylized violence quite like David Cronenberg.

No Country for Old Men. One of the best movies I've seen in years. Bardem was incredible.

Persepolis. I rented this and failed to watch it for some reason. I'll have to try again.

Invention is the Green Goblin of Necessary Lemonade.

--Flowers
#40 by Ergo
2008-07-22 20:27:31
My list ended up being more of a favorites list than anything, but I think most of them are relevant to the discussion.

Invention is the Green Goblin of Necessary Lemonade.

--Flowers
#41 by m0nty
2008-07-22 21:06:55
http://tinfinger.blogspot.com
I was going to shit on this because it bears the evil stench of QT3, but hell, it's Hugin, how can you stay mad at a face like that?

1973
Best: Can't say I like anything in particular from that list as echoing down the ages. The Sting won the Oscar that year but it's not all that fabulous. Enter The Dragon was influential, I guess. I never saw American Graffiti and only saw Mean Streets just recently.
Fave: Enter The Dragon is always watchable on late night TV.
Yet to see: I always liked the video cover for Papillon when I walked past it at video stores. I bet the movie sucks though.

1982
Best: "Ah! You Brade Lunner!" Apparently that stupid Times top 100 movies released last week not only didn't have Citizen Kane but it didn't have Blade Runner either, which only cements how fucking stupid the Times of London is.
Fave: "Sit on my faaaaace, and tell me that you love me!" ... "Never be rude to an Arab" ... "ALBATROSS! GET YER ALBATROSS!"
Yet to see: I have seen Gandhi, but I do want to see it again because the one and only time I did see it was in a Bangalore theatre with my extremely white nuclear family with a thousand Indians who jumped up and hollered insults en masse during all of the massacre scenes where extremely white Englishmen beat, tortured and shot thousands of Indians. Under those circumstances, fearing just a tad for our lives, enjoyment of the actual film was somewhat tempered.

1991
Best: Silence of the Lambs would be the obvious pick, but I'd say Terminator 2. There are far more films these days that owe something to T2, it was a significant leap forward in the action film genre.
Fave: Double Impact. Apart from the tagline which I would argue is the best in the history of cinema - Double the Van Damme, double the Van Damage - the appearance of the bazongas on the blonde were a key event in my pubescent development.
Yet to see: The Rocketeer. Apparently Jennifer Connelly's boobs put in the performance of her lifetime. Plus I played the C64 game and could never work out how to get the damn guy to fly... I only found out recently that that was the copy protection working on my warezed copy, grrr...

2000
Best: Another weak year I think. Some might say Almost Famous, I found it a little too smug. Gladiator won the Oscar but it wasn't capital-G Great. Chicken Run was influential in its own way. I'd have to go with Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon because it will be seen in retrospect as the movie that enabled a whole swathe of Chinese crossover films. I saw a preview today for the upcoming one with Jet Li and Jackie Chan, looks interesting.
Fave: American Psycho. Christian Bale instantly became the man most likely that heterosexual men would turn gay for. If he asked. Maybe even if he didn't.
Yet to see: Best In Show. Apparently this is the best of the Christopher Guest ensemble vehicles, I haven't seen any of them.

Did I do good, Hugin?
#42 by McBain
2008-07-22 21:13:22
1978

The Deer Hunter - This movie makes me think of that Bruce Springsteen song "The River".  Both are about how your life doesn't turn out the way you hoped, no matter how hard you try.

Up In Smoke - I prefer Chong to Cheech.  His delivery of some of the lines in this movie is perfect.  I still laugh when I watch it.

Watership Down - I've always intended to see this.  I've heard its violent and not meant for kids.  Is it like Animal Farm?  Is it about the holocaust?  I don't know, because I've never gotten to it.

1985

Back to the Future - One of the most thoughtfully constructed films ever created.  There are tons of little details to be picked up on in subsequent viewings.  I remember seeing this movie in the theater with my family one afternoon, and we liked it so much we saw it a second time later that evening.  It's just a wonderfully produced film, filled with great dialogue, good pacing, and perfect narrative construction.  Sorry for such a boring choice.

Real Genius - Underrated teen sex comedy genre film.  Highly memorable Val Kilmer performance.  Still one of my favorite films.

Re-Animator - What's it about?  I don't know.

(movies I wanted to pick and talk about: Peewee's Big Adventure, The Purple Rose of Cairo, Clue)

1992

The Player - Movies by Hollywood veterans that satirize Hollywood tend to be insular affairs, but this one pulls off the comedy through sheer intelligence.  For best effect, make this film the second part of a triple feature including first this movie, then "The Player", then this American remake of the first film.

Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me - This film is completely useless if you have not seen *every* episode of the television series.  If you have seen all of the television series, this movie is a great addition, tying up some loose ends, answering some questions, and then leaving you with a lot of other questions that will never be resolved.  I think the best mysteries are left unsolved as true resolution will never live up to your imagination.

Bad Lieutenant - I've heard Harvey Keitel is great in this movie, and also shows his cock.  Never seen it though.

2000

Jesus' Son - Gloomy tale of an anonymous drug addict, who finds heartache and true love.  Contains two of the saddest moments I've ever seen on film.  There are some rather humorous elements here and there, however.  Billy Crudup gives a fantastic performance in the lead role.

Yi Yi - This Taiwanese film tells the story of a family just like yours.  It is funny, sad, heartwarming, and intelligent.  It's nice to see such a life affirming film that doesn't descend into sappy idiotic manipulation.  Truly demonstrates that the human experience is universal in any language.

The Boondock Saints - Never seen it.  I guess some people really love this movie and compare it to The Usual Suspects.

2007

There Will Be Blood - I'm a sucker for beautiful camera work and a big performance.  I loved Daniel Day Lewis, and yes, the climactic "I drink your milkshake" scene is really fantastic.  It's a blustery exhilarating tale of American values.

Alpha Dog - This movie isn't actually very good at all.  But it is quite surprisingly good for about an hour until the third act descends into complete failure on every level.  For 60 minutes, the film captures a teen nihilism that you'd expect from a Bret Easton Ellis novel.  It reminded me of Brick but without the conceit.  The third act, however is a morbid failure, which I won't detail here.  I will only tell you that it contains a sobbing Sharon Stone in a fat suit.  The film is memorable for what might have been.

Lars and the Real Girl - I've heard nothing but good things about this movie.  Also Ryan Gosling is a talented actor.  I hope to see it soon.

#43 by McBain
2008-07-22 21:16:15
Porky's probably had the most impact, didn't it start the 80's teen sex comedy thing?

I'd argue that Caddyshack was the first important one, with some influence from Animal House.

#44 by m0nty
2008-07-22 21:20:37
http://tinfinger.blogspot.com
Ohshit, I did four years instead of five. Well, I'll pick one from the middle.

1987
Best: Full Metal Jacket. Probably just for the first half of the movie rather than the second, but still well worth it. I bought my cousin the DVD of this for Christmas because he has this fucking stupid idea in his head that he might join the army. Hopefully Sgt Hartman can dissuade him.
Fave: Predator. The pacing in this movie is excellent, script is consistently memorable, technically it's near flawless for its limited ambition. Schwarzenegger's best performance, if such things count.
Yet to see: The Princess Bride. If only to see Henson when it was still Jim at the helm.
#45 by jjohnsen
2008-07-22 21:24:07
http://www.johnsenclan.com
You really do need to see Princess Bride, it's one of the best movie ever.

#46 by McBain
2008-07-22 21:27:31
Yeah, I tried to play within the rules as well, but the first rule is giving me the most issues. I picked 1987, for example, and the 'best' movie there is RoboCop, but to be honest, I don't think it has the same resonance for today's young adult movie goer as it would for someone in their mid-30s.

I don't think that matters.  Movies have always been and will always be artifacts of the particular time they were made.  "Robocop" is a satire that requires contextual knowledge of the time and country it is about.

#47 by McBain
2008-07-22 21:28:06
Yes, The Princess Bride is one of the best films ever made.

#48 by m0nty
2008-07-22 21:35:18
http://tinfinger.blogspot.com
McBain (#42):
Watership Down - I've always intended to see this.  I've heard its violent and not meant for kids.  Is it like Animal Farm?  Is it about the holocaust?  I don't know, because I've never gotten to it.

It's scary in several places, though given the age of the film you can judge it more leniently these days. I remember a sequence where a cat pounces on our hero and toys with him, that would be confronting for a child of a certain age. There's a lot of stuff about death, so if your youngun doesn't really know much about that then this is perhaps not suitable.

As for its artistic merit, it's a fine film and the book on which it is based is excellent. No, I don't remember the rabbits being Jewish, or communist. Very English though.
#49 by gaggle
2008-07-22 21:58:15
#47 by McBain
Yes, The Princess Bride is one of the best films ever made.

Wow. Whoa. I've always know some considered it better than I really ever understood but this? Seriously? It was a fun movie yes, but so was Men In Tights. How can it possibly be on any top-x lists, much less considered a best film of anything?

"You can produce nuclear reactions directly through ultra high electric field initiated photodisintegration."
#50 by McBain
2008-07-22 21:59:17
It is on my top 20 of all time list.  I don't see any reason to apologize for that.

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